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  • DeCarlo Rules: Thanks, VJ. I did not know of Penny Peabody. If they're going to reprint Little Archie, I wish they'd reprint the longer, better (pre-1965) ones by Bolling. It seems like the longer stories allowed Bolling to create something more interesting out of LA, but there seems like some taboo against reprinting them in the digests.
    Today at 09:46:35 PM
  • BettyReggie: I plan to watch Riverdale Espoide #1 & # 2 on The CW. Website later.
    Today at 06:42:39 PM
  • Vegan Jughead: Penny Peabody was the girlfriend of Fangs Fogarty, the bully in the Little Archie comics.  I know you don't love those and even if you did read a lot of them, she's barely in them.  Really obscure.  Real Ms Grundy is dead I think.  This one stole her identity if I remember correctly.
    Today at 12:23:28 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: ...and if Ms. Grundy wasn't Ms. Grundy, then who was she, and where is the real Ms. Grundy?
    Today at 05:59:39 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Penny Peabody? ... original character created by the show's writers?
    Today at 05:56:42 AM
  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "Archie's Weird Mysteries": "I Was a Teenage Vampire": [link]
    October 22, 2017, 09:04:01 PM
  • Ronny G: Actually yesterday. Today's Sunday, but I just got home from vacation today!
    October 22, 2017, 07:11:20 PM
  • Ronny G: Got my Betty and Veronica Halloween Annual digest in the mail today! YAY!
    October 22, 2017, 07:09:45 PM
  • Vegan Jughead: Hey but who needs Moose and Midge when you can have such prominent characters as Penny Peabody and Toni Topaz on the show?
    October 22, 2017, 10:30:03 AM
  • Vegan Jughead: Ms. Grundy would have been a total surprise but it turned out she wasn't really Ms. Grundy so I can let that go.  Killing Moose after barely seeing him last year and Midge after she was in literally one episode (and barely in it, at that) seems ridiculous.
    October 21, 2017, 08:31:51 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: For a character franchise that's been running for 75+ years, ARCHIE really has a pretty small cast of regulars. Apart from the core 5 and the other 6 already mentioned, there's Cheryl & Jason and Kevin... and (filed under "extended supporting players") the teachers and parents. That's pretty much it. 14 teen characters and their parents & teachers. Sabrina and Josie and their supporting casts coexist in Riverdale, but they're really their own separate franchises. If your murder victims turn out to be Jinx Malloy and Cricket O'Dell, there's not much drama in it, beyond a shrug.
    October 21, 2017, 07:12:39 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Why Moose and Midge? Good question... let me know if you can think of any other ongoing characters who are more expendable, but still well-known. I guess the other likely candidates would be Dilton and Ethel, or Chuck and Nancy. I guess you could come up with a short list of other names, but are they really that well-known? Ms. Grundy was a total surprise!
    October 21, 2017, 06:45:30 AM
  • BettyReggie: Midtown Comics has the new January 2018 Comics. I preordered mine.
    October 20, 2017, 05:17:44 PM
  • CAPalace: Seriously though why are Moose and Midge like one of the first people to die whenever they are in the horror stories line and now Riverdale lol
    October 20, 2017, 12:36:49 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: I recently watched Geek House's reaction to the episode. They're very amateur. They often leave in false starts and farting around before the actual intro. Joey often struggles with the episode title, like he can't just look it up before they start recording. Joey has to announce that he's putting the video into full screen and then does a countdown. Cut all of that stuff out! In the new review, he and his wife didn't react at all to Moose and Midge being killed. It soon became apparent that they didn't even know it was Moose and Midge! Joey referred to them as the "drug addicts".
    October 20, 2017, 11:42:14 AM
  • Vegan Jughead: Oh, wow, that sucks.
    October 20, 2017, 09:21:57 AM
  • JonInIowaCity: I'm not saying that they're dead, but they're not listed as appearing in any future episodes in IMBD, while other minor characters are.
    October 20, 2017, 08:53:10 AM
  • Vegan Jughead: I don't think Moose and Midge are dead.  I hope not.  It's one thing to kill Jason Blossom.  Killing two characters who have been around for 68 years is something else entirely.
    October 20, 2017, 07:43:40 AM


Author Topic: Some reviews.  (Read 21293 times)

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DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #60 on: March 16, 2017, 03:52:53 AM »
PATSY WALKER AKA HELLCAT #16 (of 17) - The penultimate issue of the series. Can't say I'm too surprised, as I knew it wasn't selling that great. This seems to be the general pattern for most Marvel series that I like - they last for somewhere between 12 and 18 issues before ending. Recent examples that come to mind include FF (2nd series, 16 issues, 2013-2014), SHE-HULK (12 issues, 2014-15), ANT-MAN (19 issues over two series bridged by a one-shot, 2015-2016), HOWARD THE DUCK (5 + 11 issues over 2 series, 2015-16), and SQUADRON SUPREME (15 issues, 2016-17). The only Marvel title that I really like that seems to have escaped the chopping block (so far, anyway) is SILVER SURFER (15 + 9 issues over 2 series, 2014-2017).

Too bad about PATSY WALKER, because #16 was possibly my favorite issue of the entire series so far. There's basically no action here, and nobody punched anyone (or anything), with Patsy only wearing the Hellcat costume on 2 pages (plus one more panel) of the story. The entire issue is conversation, but what I liked about it is that Patsy had a conversation with her erstwhile frenemy Hedy Wolfe (who up to this point in the series had been portrayed more like a typical soap-opera scheming, manipulative villainess) and made a sort of peace with her. At this point I realized that this was just what the series had been lacking. I was halfway through reading the story, hoping that maybe this was a change of direction in the series to hopefully see if they could find some new readers, but alas the letters page revealed that it was not to be. Apparently it had been hovering at the cancellation point for a few issues, but the editor at Marvel allowed the creative team to wrap the current storyline up as they had intended, rather than force them to write some kind of hurried ending a few issues previous. Ah well.

I'd still like to see someone take a stab at a PATSY & HEDY series again someday. They were essentially Atlas/Marvel's answer to B&V for 15 years and 110 issues (1952-1967), although their relationship was more like that between Archie and Reggie than B&V's. Incidentally, Al Hartley was the main artist on that title for most of its lifespan (in addition to being the main artist on the PATSY WALKER solo title). Al Jaffee (now mainly remembered for his work on MAD Magazine) drew the earliest issues of the title, and in the beginning the stories were mostly humorous. Patsy had actually been created all the way back in 1944, as a feature appearing in MISS AMERICA, by well-known comic book scribe Otto Binder (famous for his work on Fawcett's CAPTAIN MARVEL in the 1940s and 1950s, and later, as the writer of many of the SUPERMAN family titles under editor Mort Weisinger in the early Silver Age), together with artist Ruth Atkinson, and received her own title in 1945, which ran for 20 years, ending in 1965 - but PATSY AND HEDY continued for over a year longer, attesting to the greater popularity of the two girls as rivals. Like KATY KEENE, the title often featured fashion pages with designs submitted by readers, or paper dolls to cut-out-&-paste on cardboard. Also like B&V, Patsy & Hedy started out as high school girls, but in issue #95 (Aug. 1964), they actually graduated, and subsequent issues of P&H were subtitled "Career Girls". This more or less coincided with a general shift away from humor towards soap-opera/romance plots, in post-1962 issues. From 1963 through mid-1967, all of Marvel's 'girl titles' - MILLIE THE MODEL, MODELING WITH MILLIE, PATSY WALKER, and PATSY AND HEDY, would probably best be classified as "romance" titles, although they had all started out as "girl humor" titles, and remained so for a decade or more. A somewhat typical issue of the later run of P&H was #104, which is strikingly similar to the 2006 New Look B&V story "Bad Boy Trouble" with Patsy and Hedy both being attracted to a Marlon Brando-type 'Wild One' eerily prescient of Nick St. Clair.

It's interesting to note that of all the titles Timely/Atlas/Marvel published from the 1940s through the 1960s, Patsy Walker and Millie the Model were the only two characters who had their own titles in continuous publication from the Golden Age right through to the Silver Age of comics, a time spanning tumultuous changes in the entire comics industry. That makes them part of a very select group of comic book characters who can claim likewise. At DC, there were Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, as well as The Fox and the Crow and Leave It To Binky. At ACP, Archie, Wilbur, Katy Keene, and Jughead (who barely qualifies, his own title having squeaked in just barely in 1949). At Dell/Western Publishing, Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, Popeye, and Tarzan.

The other thing noteworthy about the 1963-1967 period in which all the girl humor titles converted to soap operas is that this was a time period in which audiences were changing and genres were in transition. The continued story which would soon become one of the hallmarks of Marvel Comics was not yet fixed, and the girl titles didn't have continuing stories. It wasn't even standard procedure for the superhero titles in this early stage of the resurgence of the superhero comics, and even the idea of a 'romance' title with continuing characters hadn't really existed up to this point in time. The emotional angst of romance comics was to make a significant impact on Marvel's Silver Age comics though, in the romantic relationships of many (if not most) of Marvel's superhero characters. Maintaining his secret identity as Spider-Man caused Peter Parker to have relationship problems with girls, keeping them at arm's length. An early potential love interest, Betty Brant, J. Jonah Jameson's secretary at the Daily Bugle, where Parker sold news photos of himself in action as Spider-Man, had a romantic interest in Peter that was reciprocal, but maintaining his secret life as Spider-Man always kept them apart - he could never explain his odd disappearances, or occasional injuries in battles with supervillains. A rival for Peter in the form of Bugle reporter Ned Leeds also had romantic feelings for Betty. Blind attorney Matt Murdock had a similar romantic interest in his legal secretary, Karen Page, and she in him, but both his blindness and his secret identity as Daredevil kept the two from ever developing a real relationship. In order to teach him humility, Odin, leader of the Norse Gods of Asgard, had punished his son Thor's hubris in ancient times by means of an enchantment which kept him trapped in the body of a lame mortal physician, Dr. Donald Blake. Blake loved his nurse, Jane Foster, but Odin disapproved of his choice of a mortal woman as a mate, and Blake felt his physical infirmity while in his mortal guise made him somehow unworthy of Jane's love, while Jane was falling in love with Blake's Asgardian alter-ego, Thor. Dr. Bruce Banner, a nuclear physicist who was exposed to gamma radiation, causing him to turn into the raging, superstrong Incredible Hulk whenever he felt nervous stress or anxiety, loved Betty Ross, the daughter of Army General "Thunderbolt" Ross, whose avowed mission was to destroy the green behemoth, and he disdained Banner as a weak milksop and an egghead, while Banner was afraid that turning into the Hulk might expose Betty to danger. To make matters even further complicated, Major Glenn Talbot, a handsome, athletic and brave military man working under General Ross's command, also hated the Hulk, and competed with Banner for Betty's affection. These continuing soap opera elements grafted by Stan Lee onto superhero stories from romance comics stamped the Silver Age Marvel comics as different from the kind of straight, uncomplicated hero vs. villain stories in comic books that had come before, and were one of the key ingredients in their rise to popularity over DC Comics from the beginning to the end of the 1960s. Even though romance comics as a genre were already beginning to die out in the 1960s, the sticky emotional situations, misunderstandings, and rivalries and secrets that had given that genre its popularity to begin with lived on in the new Marvel superhero comics -- but there would be no resolution to these romantic crises, as the romantic subplots continued like daytime dramas from issue to issue. One can't help but wonder what might have happened if Patsy Walker and Millie the Model had also developed continuing dramas with supporting characters always at emotional odds with each other, like a true soap opera. That genre had been well-established since the days of radio dramas in the 1940s.

The last couple of issues of PATSY AND HEDY, cover-dated Dec. 1966 and Feb. 1967, were subtitled "Gals on the GO-GO!" and tried to tap into some Tiger Beat-style teen-mag hybrid fascination with celebrity teen pop, something that DC Comics was also doing at the time in a couple of their romance titles. Neither PATSY AND HEDY nor PATSY WALKER's solo title lasted long enough to catch the late-1968 trend at most major publishers to do teen-humor Archie Comics-style, in the wake of THE ARCHIE SHOW's debut in September 1968 to great television ratings. Marvel, always one to keep a watchful eye on what was selling for their competitors, was actually ahead of the trend, converting MILLIE THE MODEL to THE NEW MILLIE THE MODEL with issue #154, cover-dated Oct. '67, and later adding a new title starring MILLIE'S RIVAL CHILI (May '69), while DC followed suit in '68 by converting some of its older teen titles like LEAVE IT TO BINKY/BINKY'S BUDDIES and SWING WITH SCOOTER to this style, and later adding DATE WITH DEBBI/DEBBI'S DATES. Both companies featured the cartooning of Stan Goldberg on titles, while DC also included future ACP talents Henry Scarpelli, Doug Crane, and the prodigal Samm Schwartz, before he returned to ACP.





« Last Edit: March 16, 2017, 10:49:15 AM by DeCarlo Rules »

irishmoxie

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #61 on: March 16, 2017, 10:07:31 AM »
PATSY WALKER AKA HELLCAT #16 (of 17) - The penultimate issue of the series. Can't say I'm too surprised, as I knew it wasn't selling that great. This seems to be the general pattern for most Marvel series that I like - they last for somewhere between 12 and 18 issues before ending. Recent examples that come to mind include FF (2nd series, 16 issues, 2013-2014), SHE-HULK (12 issues, 2014-15), ANT-MAN (19 issues over two series bridged by a one-shot, 2015-2016), HOWARD THE DUCK (5 + 11 issues over 2 series, 2015-16), and SQUADRON SUPREME (15 issues, 2016-17). The only Marvel title that I really like that seems to have escaped the chopping block (so far, anyway) is SILVER SURFER (15 + 9 issues over 2 series, 2014-2017).

Too bad about PATSY WALKER, because #16 was possibly my favorite issue of the entire series so far. There's basically no action here, and nobody punched anyone (or anything), with Patsy only wearing the Hellcat costume on 2 pages (plus one more panel) of the story. The entire issue is conversation, but what I liked about it is that Patsy had a conversation with her erstwhile frenemy Hedy Wolfe (who up to this point in the series had been portrayed more like a typical soap-opera scheming, manipulative villainess) and made a sort of peace with her. At this point I realized that this was just what the series had been lacking. I was halfway through reading the story, hoping that maybe this was a change of direction in the series to hopefully see if they could find some new readers, but alas the letters page revealed that it was not to be. Apparently it had been hovering at the cancellation point for a few issues, but the editor at Marvel allowed the creative team to wrap the current storyline up as they had intended, rather than force them to write some kind of hurried ending a few issues previous. Ah well.

I'd still like to see someone take a stab at a PATSY & HEDY series again someday. They were essentially Atlas/Marvel's answer to B&V for 15 years and 110 issues (1952-1967), although their relationship was more like that between Archie and Reggie than B&V's. Incidentally, Al Hartley was the main artist on that title for most of its lifespan (in addition to being the main artist on the PATSY WALKER solo title). Al Jaffee (now mainly remembered for his work on MAD Magazine) drew the earliest issues of the title, and in the beginning the stories were mostly humorous. Patsy had actually been created all the way back in 1944, as a feature appearing in MISS AMERICA, by well-known comic book scribe Otto Binder (famous for his work on Fawcett's CAPTAIN MARVEL in the 1940s and 1950s, and later, as the writer of many of the SUPERMAN family titles under editor Mort Weisinger in the early Silver Age), together with artist Ruth Atkinson, and received her own title in 1945, which ran for 20 years, ending in 1965 - but PATSY AND HEDY continued for over a year longer, attesting to the greater popularity of the two girls as rivals. Like KATY KEENE, the title often featured fashion pages with designs submitted by readers, or paper dolls to cut-out-&-paste on cardboard. Also like B&V, Patsy & Hedy started out as high school girls, but in issue #95 (Aug. 1964), they actually graduated, and subsequent issues of P&H were subtitled "Career Girls". This more or less coincided with a general shift away from humor towards soap-opera/romance plots, in post-1962 issues. From 1963 through mid-1967, all of Marvel's 'girl titles' - MILLIE THE MODEL, MODELING WITH MILLIE, PATSY WALKER, and PATSY AND HEDY, would probably best be classified as "romance" titles, although they had all started out as "girl humor" titles, and remained so for a decade or more. A somewhat typical issue of the later run of P&H was #104, which is strikingly similar to the 2006 New Look B&V story "Bad Boy Trouble" with Patsy and Hedy both being attracted to a Marlon Brando-type 'Wild One' eerily prescient of Nick St. Clair.

It's interesting to note that of all the titles Timely/Atlas/Marvel published from the 1940s through the 1960s, Patsy Walker and Millie the Model were the only two characters who had their own titles in continuous publication from the Golden Age right through to the Silver Age of comics, a time spanning tumultuous changes in the entire comics industry. That makes them part of a very select group of comic book characters who can claim likewise. At DC, there were Superman, Batman, and Wonder Woman, as well as The Fox and the Crow and Leave It To Binky. At ACP, Archie, Wilbur, Katy Keene, and Jughead (who barely qualifies, his own title having squeaked in just barely in 1949). At Dell/Western Publishing, Donald Duck, Mickey Mouse, Popeye, and Tarzan.

The other thing noteworthy about the 1963-1967 period in which all the girl humor titles converted to soap operas is that this was a time period in which audiences were changing and genres were in transition. The continued story which would soon become one of the hallmarks of Marvel Comics was not yet fixed, and the girl titles didn't have continuing stories. It wasn't even standard procedure for the superhero titles in this early stage of the resurgence of the superhero comics, and even the idea of a 'romance' title with continuing characters hadn't really existed up to this point in time. The emotional angst of romance comics was to make a significant impact on Marvel's Silver Age comics though, in the romantic relationships of many (if not most) of Marvel's superhero characters. Maintaining his secret identity as Spider-Man caused Peter Parker to have relationship problems with girls, keeping them at arm's length. An early potential love interest, Betty Brant, J. Jonah Jameson's secretary at the Daily Bugle, where Parker sold news photos of himself in action as Spider-Man, had a romantic interest in Peter that was reciprocal, but maintaining his secret life as Spider-Man always kept them apart - he could never explain his odd disappearances, or occasional injuries in battles with supervillains. A rival for Peter in the form of Bugle reporter Ned Leeds also had romantic feelings for Betty. Blind attorney Matt Murdock had a similar romantic interest in his legal secretary, Karen Page, and she in him, but both his blindness and his secret identity as Daredevil kept the two from ever developing a real relationship. In order to teach him humility, Odin, leader of the Norse Gods of Asgard, had punished his son Thor's hubris in ancient times by means of an enchantment which kept him trapped in the body of a lame mortal physician, Dr. Donald Blake. Blake loved his nurse, Jane Foster, but Odin disapproved of his choice of a mortal woman as a mate, and Blake felt his physical infirmity while in his mortal guise made him somehow unworthy of Jane's love, while Jane was falling in love with Blake's Asgardian alter-ego, Thor. Dr. Bruce Banner, a nuclear physicist who was exposed to gamma radiation, causing him to turn into the raging, superstrong Incredible Hulk whenever he felt nervous stress or anxiety, loved Betty Ross, the daughter of Army General "Thunderbolt" Ross, whose avowed mission was to destroy the green behemoth, and he disdained Banner as a weak milksop and an egghead, while Banner was afraid that turning into the Hulk might expose Betty to danger. To make matters even further complicated, Captain Glenn Talbot, a handsome, athletic and brave military man working under General Ross's command, also hated the Hulk, and competed with Banner for Betty's affection. These continuing soap opera elements grafted by Stan Lee onto superhero stories from romance comics stamped the Silver Age Marvel comics as different from the kind of straight, uncomplicated hero vs. villain stories in comic books that had come before, and were one of the key ingredients in their rise to popularity over DC Comics from the beginning to the end of the 1960s. Even though romance comics as a genre were already beginning to die out in the 1960s, the sticky emotional situations, misunderstandings, and rivalries and secrets that had given that genre its popularity to begin with lived on in the new Marvel superhero comics -- but there would be no resolution to these romantic crises, as the romantic subplots continued like daytime dramas from issue to issue. One can't help but wonder what might have happened if Patsy Walker and Millie the Model had also developed continuing dramas with supporting characters always at emotional odds with each other, like a true soap opera. That genre had been well-established since the days of radio dramas in the 1940s.

The last couple of issues of PATSY AND HEDY, cover-dated Dec. 1966 and Feb. 1967, were subtitled "Gals on the GO-GO!" and tried to tap into some Tiger Beat-style teen-mag hybrid fascination with celebrity teen pop, something that DC Comics was also doing at the time in a couple of their romance titles. Neither PATSY AND HEDY nor PATSY WALKER's solo title lasted long enough to catch the late-1968 trend at most major publishers to do teen-humor Archie Comics-style, in the wake of THE ARCHIE SHOW's debut in September 1968 to great television ratings. Marvel, always one to keep a watchful eye on what was selling for their competitors, was actually ahead of the trend, converting MILLIE THE MODEL to THE NEW MILLIE THE MODEL with issue #154, cover-dated Oct. '67, and later adding a new title starring MILLIE'S RIVAL CHILI (May '69), while DC followed suit in '68 by converting some of its older teen titles like LEAVE IT TO BINKY/BINKY'S BUDDIES and SWING WITH SCOOTER to this style, and later adding DATE WITH DEBBI/DEBBI'S DATES. Both companies featured the cartooning of Stan Goldberg on titles, while DC also included future ACP talents Henry Scarpelli, Doug Crane, and the prodigal Samm Schwartz, before he returned to ACP.




I looked at the cover of this and thought it looked like a story I would like. I'm going to give it a try after ditching the series after issue 4 or so.

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #62 on: March 16, 2017, 10:35:51 AM »
I looked at the cover of this and thought it looked like a story I would like. I'm going to give it a try after ditching the series after issue 4 or so.

I enjoyed the story quite a bit, based on the character interaction between Patsy and Hedy, and was relieved to see Hedy portrayed at last as more multi-dimensional than the somewhat stock villain she played earlier in the series. I was really hoping for Hedy to become an important part of the cast, as she had been in the old Patsy series. This issue also had a more humorous bent to it, with Hedy's change of heart towards Patsy based on their long shared history and reaching out in friendship to ask forgiveness motivated by, of all things, Hedy having fallen in love with Belial, a demon from Hell who had tormented Patsy on her having previously visited his domain, sent their by her former boyfriend Daimon Hellstrom, the Son of Satan. Oh, and Belial is also very sorry for what he did to Patsy, too.

That should probably give you some idea that in no way is this one issue comprehensible to anyone as a stand-alone story. There's just tons of old business being tied up here, and anyone who hadn't read the rest of the series prior to this would just be completely lost.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2017, 10:38:32 AM by DeCarlo Rules »

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #63 on: March 16, 2017, 07:33:21 PM »
Please Tell Me! GALKO-chan Vol. 2 - A weird slice-of-life comedy told in short segments, that purports to tell what Japanese high school girls talk about. Bodily functions, sex, hygiene, biological mysteries. Sharing feminine hygiene products, constipation, boobs, weight loss, pedicures, diets, nipples, belly-button lint, wiping one's bum. Of course they talk about other things as well, but it just seemed like I should get the "stuff you don't read about in comic books" out in the open first. Funny but in a subdued way that feels fairly genuine. I was attracted to this because of the unusual look of the artwork, which is in color -- but not the usual sort of four-color comics we're used to. The line art is mostly in shades of purple or dark blue (although borders, balloons, and lettering remain in black), and the coloring is done in textures, as with a fine-line marker or coloring pencils. In all probability it's being done in a graphics program to give it this unusual look, but I like the resulting effect.

Some of the pages have punch lines of a sort, after opening with a title like "When 2 people who are wearing glasses kiss, do their glasses bump and get in the way?" ... OR ... "Is it true that horny guys tend to lose their hair faster?" Please Tell Me! GALKO-chan.

I hadn't realized there was a anime made out of this last year, but the anime follows the actual content of the manga pretty closely, so that's the best way of getting an idea of the content of this manga ... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=10m-Y27K96c

The anime is all right, but isn't so interesting-looking in terms of the visuals. It's nothing special animation-wise, just your standard competent animation job. The cover of the book I've got here reproduces exactly the look of the pages inside (along with the margin notes about the characters in each strip).

GALKO: Despite her sharp tongue, she's a nice kid -- and popular in class. Her hobbies include cooking and watching movies.

OTAKO: She sits in a corner in the back of the class, but she and Galko are good friends, for some reason! Her hobby is teasing Galko.

OJOU :  An airhead who often gets involved in Galko and Otako's conversations. She has plenty of hobbies, but her current favorite is ... them.

All of the characters have punning nicknames. Galko is a kogal girl into fashion and makeup. Otako is a nerdy girl into manga and anime. Ojou is a rich girl who has everything but brothers and sisters, and lives in a big mansion with a huge home entertainment system. To be honest, I think Ojou gets a bad rap here with that "airhead" line. During summer vacation, she sent postcards to Galko and Otoko, inviting them to come to see her perform at a piano recital. After following Ojou's ridiculously detailed directions to find the recital hall (they stopped at a tobacconist's store along the way to shake paws with the friendly cat who lives there), they were ushered into the hall with great reverence and treated like V.I.P.s, and when Ojou went up on stage to perform, she appeared in a beautiful evening gown with her hair elegantly coiffed, wearing a tiara, earrings, and a jeweled necklace. Ojou then proceeded to sit down at the piano, and play a difficult, complicated and beautiful piece of music. After her stunning performance at the recital, they all went out to a local Japanese restaurant and Ojou looked at the waitress and said "I'll have the usual". Galko and Otoko asked if she came to the restaurant a lot, but I just got the idea that Ojou was trying to impress them by being suave. When the waitress brought Ojou's order it was Curry Udon (a very messy dish of ramen noodles in a soup-like sauce that is eaten with chopsticks), but despite the fact that Ojou was still wearing her elegant gown from the recital, she managed to methodically but gracefully consume all her noodles without spilling or splashing a drop.


DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #64 on: May 19, 2017, 06:28:56 AM »
JUGHEAD #15 (May 2017) - How could I not like an issue of Jughead drawn by Derek Charm and featuring both Sabrina and Josie & the Pussycats as guest-stars? That pretty much sealed the deal for me in terms of whether I'd continue reading the title after the departure of former Jughead writer Ryan North, and despite my dislike of Mark Waid's writing on ARCHIE. So, Waid and co-writer Ian Flynn have me for at least one story-arc, now let's see if they can impress me. While the story's not as inherently funny as what preceded under North's authorship, Derek Charm does his level best to wring the most humor possible out of the script he's been given here, which in some ways is kind of a throwback to the general plot of "Jughead finds himself in an uncomfortable situation where he's being chased by girls". That would fit the general description of a number of classic Jughead stories.

I call shame, shame on the shoot-from-the-hip knee-jerk reactionary Twitterati lambasting Waid for what they perceived as a betrayal of the new Jughead's established asexual persona, based on nothing more than a snippet of plot outlined in the solicitation copy and THIS highly-exaggerated variant cover by Marguerite Savage, which leaves us with the impression that Jughead is now starring in one of those harem comedy mangas:



Nothing could be further from the case, and there's not a shred of evidence here to imply the least bit of waffling about Jughead previously-established orientation. The Ace-defenders simply pre-judged Waid's story. Based on their dislike of Ryan North leaving the title, or their dislike of Waid's work on ARCHIE, I don't know. I was leery myself of what to expect, but so far it seems to be turning out better than expected.

There are certainly nits to pick. Sabrina casts a spell using a magic wand? When has she ever needed any sort of appliances to apply her witchcraft? She's not a stage magician, and aside from some spellcraft books, physical objects imbued with mystic power have never played any sort of role in Sabrina stories. She enchants the Pussycats' instruments so that when they hear themselves play, they'll "become big fans of Jughead Jones", which in typical Sabrina-plot fashion, turns into a spell which makes them all fall madly in love with Jughead (even though they've never met him, and don't even know who he is). That's a little awkward. Waid & Flynn could certainly have come up with a better way of achieving the same effect. Any WHY is Sabrina casting this spell? To allow Jughead to attend the Pussycats' live show at the Lodge Ampitheater. Because he forgot his fully-punched "Chok'lit Tik'it" among the hamburger wrappers he left on his tray while hastily excusing himself (to avoid paying his tab) after a gorge-fest at Pop's, which he then peers in the window and sees Pop disposing of with the rest of his trash while cleaning up his table. He's too embarrassed to try to go back for it, because he'd then have to face Pop about settling his meal tab. Yet he's been eating tons of food at Pop's, and earlier Archie didn't give him his ticket for the concert because he figured that Jughead had eaten enough food at Pop's and punched enough Chok'lit Tik'its to "claim enough tickets (to the Pussycats' concert) for half of Riverdale". Which makes sense, given what we know about Jughead's appetite and his ability to run up a tab at Pop Tate's... so why would he be so concerned about this one ticket he left behind? Doesn't he have a half-dozen more? But apparently, he doesn't, so Sabrina tries to magic his problem away. And why is Jughead so hot to go to a Pussycats concert? Well, it's not for the girls or the music, it's for the arena's selection of junk foods that he considers rare delicacies. So couldn't Sabrina just have magicked up some of that same choice arena junk food? Or couldn't Jughead just have asked Veronica to get her father to give her a VIP pass for Jughead to the Lodge Ampitheather? I'm not sure if Mark Waid's version of Veronica is some kind of space alien or something. She doesn't even seem to be aware of such common colloquial expressions as "greasy spoon" and refers to this as "greasy fork" (based on her assertion that the specific utensil is irrelevant, since they'd all be equally as greasy. Really.) And how can the Pussycats fall madly in love with Jughead without even knowing who he is? So, yeah... plotting that makes some kind of sense is not the strong suit of this story. It's unclear how the duties broke down between Mark Waid and Ian Flynn, but I'm going to say that Waid didn't spend a great deal of time thinking the plot through. But who cares? It's got Derek Charm, and Sabrina and Melody and Valerie and Josie in it. I hope Waid spends some more time actually thinking about the plot in future issues, though.




DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #65 on: May 19, 2017, 07:19:12 AM »
We could also ask how it is that Pop Tate can afford to give away tickets for a live concert (check typical prices on Ticketron) by merely purchasing a couple of dozen modestly-priced food items at his restaurant... certainly those tickets must cost far more than the profit generated by those food items -- better not to think about the logic (or lack of it).

I would say it was nice to see Toni Topaz again, but frankly, since she can't be anything more to Jughead than just a rival foodie, she's become a pointless character, IMO (some would say she was all along, but if she doesn't represent a possible romantic interest for Jughead, then she's just a background character with pink hair as far as I'm concerned). Same goes for Trula Twyst -- the new Jughead's asexual orientation renders that character pointless as well.

Vegan Jughead

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #66 on: May 19, 2017, 07:50:24 AM »
JUGHEAD #15 (May 2017) - How could I not like an issue of Jughead drawn by Derek Charm and featuring both Sabrina and Josie & the Pussycats as guest-stars? That pretty much sealed the deal for me in terms of whether I'd continue reading the title after the departure of former Jughead writer Ryan North, and despite my dislike of Mark Waid's writing on ARCHIE. So, Waid and co-writer Ian Flynn have me for at least one story-arc, now let's see if they can impress me. While the story's not as inherently funny as what preceded under North's authorship, Derek Charm does his level best to wring the most humor possible out of the script he's been given here, which in some ways is kind of a throwback to the general plot of "Jughead finds himself in an uncomfortable situation where he's being chased by girls". That would fit the general description of a number of classic Jughead stories.

I call shame, shame on the shoot-from-the-hip knee-jerk reactionary Twitterati lambasting Waid for what they perceived as a betrayal of the new Jughead's established asexual persona, based on nothing more than a snippet of plot outlined in the solicitation copy and THIS highly-exaggerated variant cover by Marguerite Savage, which leaves us with the impression that Jughead is now starring in one of those harem comedy mangas:



Nothing could be further from the case, and there's not a shred of evidence here to imply the least bit of waffling about Jughead previously-established orientation. The Ace-defenders simply pre-judged Waid's story. Based on their dislike of Ryan North leaving the title, or their dislike of Waid's work on ARCHIE, I don't know. I was leery myself of what to expect, but so far it seems to be turning out better than expected.

There are certainly nits to pick. Sabrina casts a spell using a magic wand? When has she ever needed any sort of appliances to apply her witchcraft? She's not a stage magician, and aside from some spellcraft books, physical objects imbued with mystic power have never played any sort of role in Sabrina stories. She enchants the Pussycats' instruments so that when they hear themselves play, they'll "become big fans of Jughead Jones", which in typical Sabrina-plot fashion, turns into a spell which makes them all fall madly in love with Jughead (even though they've never met him, and don't even know who he is). That's a little awkward. Waid & Flynn could certainly have come up with a better way of achieving the same effect. Any WHY is Sabrina casting this spell? To allow Jughead to attend the Pussycats' live show at the Lodge Ampitheater. Because he forgot his fully-punched "Chok'lit Tik'it" among the hamburger wrappers he left on his tray while hastily excusing himself (to avoid paying his tab) after a gorge-fest at Pop's, which he then peers in the window and sees Pop disposing of with the rest of his trash while cleaning up his table. He's too embarrassed to try to go back for it, because he'd then have to face Pop about settling his meal tab. Yet he's been eating tons of food at Pop's, and earlier Archie didn't give him his ticket for the concert because he figured that Jughead had eaten enough food at Pop's and punched enough Chok'lit Tik'its to "claim enough tickets (to the Pussycats' concert) for half of Riverdale". Which makes sense, given what we know about Jughead's appetite and his ability to run up a tab at Pop Tate's... so why would he be so concerned about this one ticket he left behind? Doesn't he have a half-dozen more? But apparently, he doesn't, so Sabrina tries to magic his problem away. And why is Jughead so hot to go to a Pussycats concert? Well, it's not for the girls or the music, it's for the arena's selection of junk foods that he considers rare delicacies. So couldn't Sabrina just have magicked up some of that same choice arena junk food? Or couldn't Jughead just have asked Veronica to get her father to give her a VIP pass for Jughead to the Lodge Ampitheather? I'm not sure if Mark Waid's version of Veronica is some kind of space alien or something. She doesn't even seem to be aware of such common colloquial expressions as "greasy spoon" and refers to this as "greasy fork" (based on her assertion that the specific utensil is irrelevant, since they'd all be equally as greasy. Really.) And how can the Pussycats fall madly in love with Jughead without even knowing who he is? So, yeah... plotting that makes some kind of sense is not the strong suit of this story. It's unclear how the duties broke down between Mark Waid and Ian Flynn, but I'm going to say that Waid didn't spend a great deal of time thinking the plot through. But who cares? It's got Derek Charm, and Sabrina and Melody and Valerie and Josie in it. I hope Waid spends some more time actually thinking about the plot in future issues, though.


I agree with everything you wrote.  GREAT review!  I think the humor was good.  It's certainly different than Ryan North and to me, North was VERY different than most other Archie writers.  Flynn and Waid seem closer to what I expect from Archie for better and worse. 


I liked the book after being skeptical and sharing my skepticism with Archie Comics when it was announced Ryan North would no longer be on the book.  They told me they thought I'd be happy with what Waid and Flynn had planned for Jughead, but what were they gonna say?  Ha ha.  Anyway, I'm cautiously optimistic for the future here, but as you say, a lot of the credit goes to Derek Charm. 


Sadly, this title hasn't been selling so we have to hope that changes or we might not get to see how this all turns out. 

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #67 on: May 20, 2017, 03:25:17 AM »
Sadly, this title hasn't been selling so we have to hope that changes or we might not get to see how this all turns out.

Digital and trade paperback sales still being an important part of the profit formula, I think we'll at least see story arcs conclude in a way that they're collectable in discrete chunks. I think we all know that the New Riverdale line of floppy comics isn't going to be a permanent fixture of ACP's publishing for the foreseeable future though. The next obvious shift would be to digital-only releases of singles, followed by a TP release (as the only print format) 6-to-12 months later, but whether any of the New Riverdale titles will still be around for that it's hard to say. Comic shop audiences are not enamored of this genre or these characters in the format which is their bread-and-butter, so ACP is likely to be one of the first companies to go that route.

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #68 on: May 20, 2017, 06:51:22 AM »
         BETTY & VERONICA SUMMER ANNUAL #253                              
   Featured character(s)      title      # pages         Script:      Pencils:      Inks: (notes)   
   Betty & Veronica      COVER      1   cover            Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Brigette's Jingle Jangle!" (NEW)      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Bob Smith   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Prints of Wails"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Party Planners"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Jeff Schultz      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Troop Money Bags"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   BETTY in      "Summertime and the Livin' Ain't Easy"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Stan Goldberg      John Lowe   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Green Dumb!"      5   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Fernando Ruiz      Rudy Lapick   
   SABRINA in      "Pussycats Plus One"      21   pages      Bill Golliher      Dan DeCarlo      Jon D'Agostino   
   SABRINA in      "Treat-To-Do!"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Big Attraction"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Fashions by the Sea"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY in      "Surf Turf"      1   page      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Bob Smith   
   BETTY'S FASHIONS      "The Hot Days of Summer"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA      "Betty & Veronica's Hawaiian Vacation"      1   page      uncredited      Dan DeCarlo      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Summer Simmer"      6   pages      George Gladir      DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   VERONICA in      "Clothes-Minded"      6   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Baby-Sitter"      6   pages      Dick Malmgren      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Way the Ball Bounces…"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Guinea Pig"      6   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY      "Beachy Keen!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Hot Looks in the Bahamas"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Clean-Up Hitter"      21   pages      Frank Doyle      DeCarlo & Parent      Allison Flood   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Archie-Free Day"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Dan DeCarlo      Dan DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Paid in Fool"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   VERONICA in      "Cabin Fever"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Jog Jag"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   MR. LODGE in      "Castle Hassle"      5   pages      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Chef's Surprise"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Fernando Ruiz      Jim Amash   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Swimsuit Issue"      5   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Mow Money"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM in      "Night School"      5   pages      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM      "Suits Me Fine!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   JASON BLOSSOM in      "Drive Out!"      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Jon D'Agostino   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Beachwear Collection!!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Some Things Never Change"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Jeff Schultz      Al Milgrom   
   BETTY      "Betty's FUN Fashions"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "T.G.I.F."      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   





irishmoxie

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #69 on: May 20, 2017, 12:31:01 PM »
         BETTY & VERONICA SUMMER ANNUAL #253                             
   Featured character(s)      title      # pages         Script:      Pencils:      Inks: (notes)   
   Betty & Veronica      COVER      1   cover            Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Brigette's Jingle Jangle!" (NEW)      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Bob Smith   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Prints of Wails"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Party Planners"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Jeff Schultz      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Troop Money Bags"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   BETTY in      "Summertime and the Livin' Ain't Easy"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Stan Goldberg      John Lowe   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Green Dumb!"      5   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Fernando Ruiz      Rudy Lapick   
   SABRINA in      "Pussycats Plus One"      21   pages      Bill Golliher      Dan DeCarlo      Jon D'Agostino   
   SABRINA in      "Treat-To-Do!"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Big Attraction"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Fashions by the Sea"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY in      "Surf Turf"      1   page      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Bob Smith   
   BETTY'S FASHIONS      "The Hot Days of Summer"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA      "Betty & Veronica's Hawaiian Vacation"      1   page      uncredited      Dan DeCarlo      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Summer Simmer"      6   pages      George Gladir      DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   VERONICA in      "Clothes-Minded"      6   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Baby-Sitter"      6   pages      Dick Malmgren      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Way the Ball Bounces…"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Guinea Pig"      6   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY      "Beachy Keen!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Hot Looks in the Bahamas"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Clean-Up Hitter"      21   pages      Frank Doyle      DeCarlo & Parent      Allison Flood   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Archie-Free Day"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Dan DeCarlo      Dan DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Paid in Fool"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   VERONICA in      "Cabin Fever"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Jog Jag"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   MR. LODGE in      "Castle Hassle"      5   pages      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Chef's Surprise"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Fernando Ruiz      Jim Amash   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Swimsuit Issue"      5   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Mow Money"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM in      "Night School"      5   pages      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM      "Suits Me Fine!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   JASON BLOSSOM in      "Drive Out!"      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Jon D'Agostino   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Beachwear Collection!!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Some Things Never Change"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Jeff Schultz      Al Milgrom   
   BETTY      "Betty's FUN Fashions"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "T.G.I.F."      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   


I would give good karma if we could still do that!

SAGG

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #70 on: May 20, 2017, 05:56:48 PM »

         BETTY & VERONICA SUMMER ANNUAL #253                             
   Featured character(s)      title      # pages         Script:      Pencils:      Inks: (notes)   
   Betty & Veronica      COVER      1   cover            Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Brigette's Jingle Jangle!" (NEW)      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Bob Smith   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Prints of Wails"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Party Planners"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Jeff Schultz      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Troop Money Bags"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   BETTY in      "Summertime and the Livin' Ain't Easy"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Stan Goldberg      John Lowe   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Green Dumb!"      5   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Fernando Ruiz      Rudy Lapick   
   SABRINA in      "Pussycats Plus One"      21   pages      Bill Golliher      Dan DeCarlo      Jon D'Agostino   
   SABRINA in      "Treat-To-Do!"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Big Attraction"      1   page      uncredited      uncredited      (1-page gag)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Fashions by the Sea"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY in      "Surf Turf"      1   page      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Bob Smith   
   BETTY'S FASHIONS      "The Hot Days of Summer"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA      "Betty & Veronica's Hawaiian Vacation"      1   page      uncredited      Dan DeCarlo      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Summer Simmer"      6   pages      George Gladir      DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   VERONICA in      "Clothes-Minded"      6   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Dan Parent   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Baby-Sitter"      6   pages      Dick Malmgren      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Way the Ball Bounces…"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "The Guinea Pig"      6   pages      Fernando Ruiz      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   BETTY      "Beachy Keen!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Hot Looks in the Bahamas"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Clean-Up Hitter"      21   pages      Frank Doyle      DeCarlo & Parent      Allison Flood   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Archie-Free Day"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Dan DeCarlo      Dan DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Paid in Fool"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Allison Flood   
   VERONICA in      "Cabin Fever"      6   pages      Frank Doyle      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Jog Jag"      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Rudy Lapick   
   MR. LODGE in      "Castle Hassle"      5   pages      George Gladir      Stan Goldberg      Rudy Lapick   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Chef's Surprise"      5   pages      Kathleen Webb      Fernando Ruiz      Jim Amash   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Swimsuit Issue"      5   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Mow Money"      6   pages      Mike Pellowski      Dan DeCarlo      Henry Scarpelli   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM in      "Night School"      5   pages      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly      Holly Golightly   
   CHERYL BLOSSOM      "Suits Me Fine!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably Parent)      (pin-up/puzzle page)   
   JASON BLOSSOM in      "Drive Out!"      5   pages      Dan Parent      Dan Parent      Jon D'Agostino   
   VERONICA      "Veronica's Beachwear Collection!!"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "Some Things Never Change"      6   pages      Barbara Slate      Jeff Schultz      Al Milgrom   
   BETTY      "Betty's FUN Fashions"      1   page      uncredited      (probably DeCarlo)      (pin-up/fashion page)   
   BETTY & VERONICA in      "T.G.I.F."      5   pages      Frank Doyle      Dan DeCarlo      Jim DeCarlo   


Hey, DR, did you boldface the Bridgette story because it's the newest one? Plus, Sabrina AND the Pussycats in "Pussycats Plus One?! With your hero DeCarlo drawing it?! Now, THERE'S the team-up with both of DeCarlo's creations as the heroines! Pretty good story, too....  :smitten:

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #71 on: May 20, 2017, 08:02:22 PM »
Hey, DR, did you boldface the Bridgette story because it's the newest one?
Exactly!

Plus, Sabrina AND the Pussycats in "Pussycats Plus One?! With your hero DeCarlo drawing it?! Now, THERE'S the team-up with both of DeCarlo's creations as the heroines! Pretty good story, too....  :smitten:

Yeah, that's from the 1987 Sabrina series, and there's still a lot of those I haven't read yet. I knew it existed (because I've looked through all the covers and contents online), but somehow I'd forgotten about that one a while ago, when someone had started a thread asking if there'd ever been a Sabrina/Josie crossover story. Apart from some of those all-star guest-star lineups in a few issues (including the Tom DeFalco/Fernando Ruiz story in B&V #271, which was the first to show Alexandra & Sabrina together), Sabrina the Teenage Witch #17 is the only issue to feature a full-fledged crossover of Sabrina and Josie that I know of.


DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #72 on: May 20, 2017, 08:05:31 PM »
I'd have to say the timing of that particular reprint isn't coincidental with the Sabrina and Josie appearing together in the current story beginning in the new JUGHEAD #15...

SAGG

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #73 on: May 20, 2017, 08:12:32 PM »

Hey, DR, did you boldface the Bridgette story because it's the newest one?
Exactly!

Plus, Sabrina AND the Pussycats in "Pussycats Plus One?! With your hero DeCarlo drawing it?! Now, THERE'S the team-up with both of DeCarlo's creations as the heroines! Pretty good story, too....  :smitten:

Yeah, that's from the 1987 Sabrina series, and there's still a lot of those I haven't read yet. I knew it existed (because I've looked through all the covers and contents online), but somehow I'd forgotten about that one a while ago, when someone had started a thread asking if there'd ever been a Sabrina/Josie crossover story. Apart from some of those all-star guest-star lineups in a few issues (including the Tom DeFalco/Fernando Ruiz story in B&V #271, which was the first to show Alexandra & Sabrina together), Sabrina the Teenage Witch #17 is the only issue to feature a full-fledged crossover of Sabrina and Josie that I know of.




"Someone started it"? Don't you mean me?  :)

https://www.archiefans.com/all-about-archie/quick-josiesabrina-question/

DeCarlo Rules

Re: Some reviews.
« Reply #74 on: May 20, 2017, 08:54:56 PM »
Couldn't remember! Did you know the "search" function no longer works? I was going to find the thread and mention the reprinted story there, but...  :(

 


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