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Re: Riverdale Reviewed by Tuxedo Mark
[June 06, 2020, 09:51:44 pm]


Re: I'm here. by ASS-P
[June 04, 2020, 05:18:59 pm]


Re: Sliding timeline by Tuxedo Mark
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Archie Art Blogs by Captain Jetpack
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Re: Archie Comics Digests... the origin story by ASS-P
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Vintage Archie Comics & Merch for Sale by archiecomicscollector
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Re: Possible issue--might need youre hekp by Tuxedo Mark
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Hypothetical Highlights for May/June 2020 by DeCarlo Rules
[March 27, 2020, 02:42:30 am]


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Shoutbox

  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "It's All an Act" from Betty and Veronica Digest #181: [link]
    June 06, 2020, 09:52:20 pm
  • ASS-P: I am going to try to sign in for a new post. Yeah, on my phone again- and in the hospital!!!!!!!!!
    June 04, 2020, 04:28:29 pm
  • Mr.Lodge: Your right about Dan Parent's art is generic at best.
    June 02, 2020, 05:58:04 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: My reviews of "Love is Nasty" [link] and "That's News to Me" [link] from Betty and Veronica Digest #180-182
    May 24, 2020, 05:35:52 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "Bath Wrath" from Betty and Veronica Digest #180: [link]
    May 22, 2020, 08:55:07 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Gah, this is so frustrating. Red Sonja and Vampirella Meet Betty and Veronica #11-12 have been pushed back again. Originally scheduled for May 27, #11 will now come out on July 1 and #13 on July 29.
    May 21, 2020, 01:30:59 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Wow, the Betty and Veronica: The Bond of Friendship OGN came out last Tuesday.
    May 19, 2020, 01:29:05 pm
  • ASS-P: ..." Expensive, sorta hilly land with zoning board3/lawd and planningcommiddions a big factor ", so mass-market things were a little rarer
    May 18, 2020, 03:10:21 pm
  • ASS-P: The funny thing is that we have this remaining K-Mart here...and we had none of them when I was here in the 20thbCentury! We had a similat, but regional, chain that was only in New York and Connecticut I think, called Caldor's, they covered the same portion of the market. We had expensive. sorta hi.
    May 17, 2020, 02:07:57 am
  • ASS-P: I grew up with a big Sears near me here,,,and it is still there! How many full-fledged Sears stores are lef
    May 17, 2020, 02:01:55 am
  • ASS-P: ......The last K I was in before this (which still had ACP digests), in Watsonville, CA, which I left six-ish months ago (the area of) is still there!!!!!
    May 17, 2020, 01:43:24 am
  • ASS-P: ...lie in bed...Perhaps I can go there later.
    May 17, 2020, 01:40:33 am
  • ASS-P: ...I noted with interest that oné of those K-Marts is less than 2 miles from where I live in bed now.
    May 17, 2020, 01:37:52 am
  • ASS-P: Westchester County is part of the New York City metro area but when I speak of it I'm speaking of Westchester, not NYC, Manhattan of " the bouroghs ".
    May 17, 2020, 01:35:20 am
  • ASS-P: ...Thank you# Yeah, 50-something, says Wiki. The whole operatic death scene of Sears had stopped getting media attention recently and likewise I'd heard of the big I'd status little if any after hearing of a plan pushed for by Lampert's creditors that would've closed down both K-Mart and Sears...
    May 17, 2020, 01:21:47 am
  • Tuxedo Mark: My Walmart has them. As for Kmart, there are only 50 left in the entire country (according to their website). Maybe even less.
    May 16, 2020, 11:19:14 pm
  • ASS-P: Bing back the link to the comic strip!
    May 16, 2020, 11:12:59 pm
  • ASS-P: I am now living in Westchester County, New York, which is my hometown area.
    May 16, 2020, 11:12:12 pm
  • ASS-P: That Wal-Mart didn't carry the DC Giants either. When they first came out, I saw them there, and other " gimmick/stunt "-packaged issues. I read that some Targets were going to carry the DC Giants but I haven't seen any at any Target where I've been.
    May 16, 2020, 11:10:53 pm
  • ASS-P: I went to a Wal-Mart-Mart recently and saw no digests, is what I meant.
    May 16, 2020, 11:06:03 pm

HOT DOG prototype - in 1964?

Started by DeCarlo Rules, April 15, 2016, 06:11:34 am

Previous topic - Next topic

DeCarlo Rules

March 18, 2017, 04:41:46 am #15 Last Edit: March 18, 2017, 04:47:05 am by DeCarlo Rules
Quote from: steveinthecity on March 17, 2017, 04:33:15 am
Quote from: SAGG on March 16, 2017, 06:49:14 pm
Actually, Hot Dog used to be Archie's dog before he was Jughead's. I recall a story like that, though I can't find it yet. Anyone else remember it?
PEP #224. "Father Knows Beast".  I haven't come across a reprint in several years.


from the GCDb entry for the story:
QuoteSynopsis:
    Fred claims not to like Jughead's dog, but when no one's looking it's a different story.


Whoever indexed that story appears not to have been aware of the confusion at ACP regarding who Hot Dog's owner was, in the early stories pre-dating The Archie Show's airing. The story description sounds familiar, as if I've read it, but I know I can't have read the original comic or any reprint from the 1970s to 1990s, so I'm thinking it must have been reprinted in some collection (or digest) within the past decade or so.  ???

60sBettyandReggie

Yet another Hot Dog lookalike (but this Baby was after Hot Dog was already created. This is from 1986). Archie artists sure liked sheep dogs!



DeCarlo Rules

March 23, 2017, 03:23:19 pm #17 Last Edit: March 23, 2017, 03:26:22 pm by DeCarlo Rules
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 22, 2017, 01:43:11 pm
Yet another Hot Dog lookalike (but this Baby was after Hot Dog was already created. This is from 1986). Archie artists sure liked sheep dogs!





You have to wonder how much of that is the colorist's responsibility. When these 'Hot Dog-lookalikes' appear in stories, the colorist could have chosen any shades of coat from gold/orange to tan/brown to various gray shades, and if he had, we might not even be discussing those examples as 'psuedo-Hot Dogs'. Sometimes, as with this particular example, I wonder if the colorist even bothered to read it. He might just have looked at the big dog in the artwork and decided 'that must be Hot Dog, so white it is, then'.

60sBettyandReggie

Quote from: DeCarlo Rules on March 23, 2017, 03:23:19 pm
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 22, 2017, 01:43:11 pm
Yet another Hot Dog lookalike (but this Baby was after Hot Dog was already created. This is from 1986). Archie artists sure liked sheep dogs!





You have to wonder how much of that is the colorist's responsibility. When these 'Hot Dog-lookalikes' appear in stories, the colorist could have chosen any shades of coat from gold/orange to tan/brown to various gray shades, and if he had, we might not even be discussing those examples as 'psuedo-Hot Dogs'. Sometimes, as with this particular example, I wonder if the colorist even bothered to read it. He might just have looked at the big dog in the artwork and decided 'that must be Hot Dog, so white it is, then'.



;D  That's true. I hadn't thought of that.


I have a silly question, what do they use to color the comics, markers?

DeCarlo Rules

March 29, 2017, 06:37:18 pm #19 Last Edit: March 29, 2017, 06:39:08 pm by DeCarlo Rules
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 29, 2017, 02:21:34 pm
Quote from: DeCarlo Rules on March 23, 2017, 03:23:19 pm
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 22, 2017, 01:43:11 pm
Yet another Hot Dog lookalike (but this Baby was after Hot Dog was already created. This is from 1986). Archie artists sure liked sheep dogs!





You have to wonder how much of that is the colorist's responsibility. When these 'Hot Dog-lookalikes' appear in stories, the colorist could have chosen any shades of coat from gold/orange to tan/brown to various gray shades, and if he had, we might not even be discussing those examples as 'psuedo-Hot Dogs'. Sometimes, as with this particular example, I wonder if the colorist even bothered to read it. He might just have looked at the big dog in the artwork and decided 'that must be Hot Dog, so white it is, then'.



;D  That's true. I hadn't thought of that.


I have a silly question, what do they use to color the comics, markers?


It's actually kind of complicated to explain, since there was a different system for coloring comic books printed using the old pre-computer technology system of four-color printing. That system basically used only 4 inks to print the comics, and a graduated screen-density for each of the 4 inks - Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. Each of those inks could be printed in one of four screen densities - 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% (those would be the little dots you see if you look really close, excepting 100% which was solid ink). All possible colors would be named by a combination of letters (to indicate which of the four inks) and numbers (to indicate which of the four screen densities). In reality you can't combine black with any other color ink, and so that left 64 possible colors.

When the colorist was coloring, he or she was really just creating "color guides" for the printer to use to create the "color separations". Each page would need one separation of a single color ink for each color used on the page, and a separate printing plate would print that color on each page, so the colorist could only use markers or color dyes (Dr. Martin's was a standard brand of watercolor used, more commonly with a brush) which matched the possible combinations of the 3 inks (yellow, cyan, magenta) in those four densities. The individual separations would be lined up using registration marks so the printer would know the separations would all be correctly aligned after the paper had been run through all four printing plates. To be on the safe side, the colorist most often wrote notes directly on the color guides so the separator at the printer's wouldn't have to guess. This Superman page was colored by Glen Whitmore, who also did a lot of the coloring for ACP:



Nowadays depending on the printing technology available, it's easier to just color everything on the computer, because the colorist can then do the actual separations as the final step in the coloring process. There's a real difference now between the way the color printing looks if you look at an older (1980s) Archie digest and compare it to a new one.

A lot more detailed information on this is available here:
http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/comics_color.htm
and here:
http://www.comicartistsdirect.com/articles/coloring.html

60sBettyandReggie

Quote from: DeCarlo Rules on March 29, 2017, 06:37:18 pm
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 29, 2017, 02:21:34 pm
Quote from: DeCarlo Rules on March 23, 2017, 03:23:19 pm
Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 22, 2017, 01:43:11 pm
Yet another Hot Dog lookalike (but this Baby was after Hot Dog was already created. This is from 1986). Archie artists sure liked sheep dogs!





You have to wonder how much of that is the colorist's responsibility. When these 'Hot Dog-lookalikes' appear in stories, the colorist could have chosen any shades of coat from gold/orange to tan/brown to various gray shades, and if he had, we might not even be discussing those examples as 'psuedo-Hot Dogs'. Sometimes, as with this particular example, I wonder if the colorist even bothered to read it. He might just have looked at the big dog in the artwork and decided 'that must be Hot Dog, so white it is, then'.



;D  That's true. I hadn't thought of that.


I have a silly question, what do they use to color the comics, markers?


It's actually kind of complicated to explain, since there was a different system for coloring comic books printed using the old pre-computer technology system of four-color printing. That system basically used only 4 inks to print the comics, and a graduated screen-density for each of the 4 inks - Cyan, Magenta, Yellow, and Black. Each of those inks could be printed in one of four screen densities - 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% (those would be the little dots you see if you look really close, excepting 100% which was solid ink). All possible colors would be named by a combination of letters (to indicate which of the four inks) and numbers (to indicate which of the four screen densities). In reality you can't combine black with any other color ink, and so that left 64 possible colors.

When the colorist was coloring, he or she was really just creating "color guides" for the printer to use to create the "color separations". Each page would need one separation of a single color ink for each color used on the page, and a separate printing plate would print that color on each page, so the colorist could only use markers or color dyes (Dr. Martin's was a standard brand of watercolor used, more commonly with a brush) which matched the possible combinations of the 3 inks (yellow, cyan, magenta) in those four densities. The individual separations would be lined up using registration marks so the printer would know the separations would all be correctly aligned after the paper had been run through all four printing plates. To be on the safe side, the colorist most often wrote notes directly on the color guides so the separator at the printer's wouldn't have to guess. This Superman page was colored by Glen Whitmore, who also did a lot of the coloring for ACP:



Nowadays depending on the printing technology available, it's easier to just color everything on the computer, because the colorist can then do the actual separations as the final step in the coloring process. There's a real difference now between the way the color printing looks if you look at an older (1980s) Archie digest and compare it to a new one.

A lot more detailed information on this is available here:
http://facweb.cs.depaul.edu/sgrais/comics_color.htm
and here:
http://www.comicartistsdirect.com/articles/coloring.html



Thanks DCR! and thanks for the links.  Man, it sure was difficult back then.

60sBettyandReggie

Quote from: 60sBettyandReggie on March 16, 2017, 12:24:00 am
Quote from: MLJ 1939 on April 17, 2016, 04:49:03 pm
Archie had a Hot Dog-esque dog named Bonaparte for one story in Archie Comics #33. He even made the cover of Archie Archives #10! Archie's other dog Oscar, who appeared in a number of Sahle-era stories, did not bear a resemblance to Hot Dog.



I just came across this Oscar dog. I had never heard of him before.






This one kinda looks like that Oscar dog





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