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Author Topic: What Kept Josie And The Pussycats Buried For So Long At Archie Comics?  (Read 5139 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

they didn't even dig them up when they got their own movie!

Captain Jetpack

You didn't hear about the boycott?
Pie is my favorite Vitamin.

irishmoxie

they didn't even dig them up when they got their own movie!

They had a good run in Archie and Friends around the time of the movie.

BettyReggie

I guess since they will be in the RiverDale show. It was time to make a comic of them again.

they didn't even dig them up when they got their own movie!

They had a good run in Archie and Friends around the time of the movie.
that doesn't really compare to the strength of having them as the lead characters in a book

it's been 23 years since a Josie And The Pussycats Comic Book Series was available....



A bunch of reasons, really:

* The movie lost a TON of money, thus hurting the brand.

* The books stopped selling. People keep SAYING they're fans of Josie & the Pussycats, but not putting their wallets where their mouths are and actually BUYING them.

* Repeated failed runs (or low-selling Mini-Series) over the past decades have made people more and more likely to not buy the books, figuring that it'll be just another quick cancellation.


* She's Josie is better anyways :) . A lot of the longtime fans think so, in any case.

i think in the world of archie another teenage misadventures book just would have gone unnoticed


Gisele

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.
I'm a cartoonist! http://www.giselelagace.com

DeCarlo Rules

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon. With stuff like KISS, The Archies, and Josie and the Pussycats, I know what they sound like because I've heard the music, but just trying to imagine music that you've never heard before doesn't work. Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television. The Josie animated cartoon didn't rely on music as much as adventures, and the original comic book tended to concentrate less on their life as a band than on just their day-to-day situations.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 03:32:17 AM by DeCarlo Rules »

Gisele

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon. With stuff like KISS, The Archies, and Josie and the Pussycats, I know what they sound like because I've heard the music, but just trying to imagine music that you've never heard before doesn't work. Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television. The Josie animated cartoon didn't rely on music as much as adventures, and the original comic book tended to concentrate less on their life as a band than on just their day-to-day situations.

In regards to Nana and Beck, they eventually did an animation and a soundtrack for both (highly recommended.) Also, for Beck, they'd include music CDs with certain volumes. These would feature various indie bands in Japan. And it was appropriate since Beck was all about the struggles of making a band, keeping it together, and trying to make a living of it. Making a successful band is quite an accomplishment. In general, not everyone likes each other, but if there's a common goal, and everyone agrees to tolerate each other, they can make it work. And it's not always the best musicians that succeed. It's basically the ones that find the formula that works, and by that I mean, good music, but also people that can work together as a team even if they don't really like each other. It's a business after all at the end of the day. Just finding members is hard (harder if you want to do an all girl band.) It's easy to think "oh, you're a drummer and we need a drummer, let's be in the same band" but that's not how it works. Everyone has their own vision of what band they want to make. So everyone is clashing and have to make compromises for a band to succeed. If they can touch on this with Josie, it COULD be interesting even if you don't head music. We'll see!
I'm a cartoonist! http://www.giselelagace.com

DeCarlo Rules

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon. With stuff like KISS, The Archies, and Josie and the Pussycats, I know what they sound like because I've heard the music, but just trying to imagine music that you've never heard before doesn't work. Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television. The Josie animated cartoon didn't rely on music as much as adventures, and the original comic book tended to concentrate less on their life as a band than on just their day-to-day situations.

In regards to Nana and Beck, they eventually did an animation and a soundtrack for both (highly recommended.) Also, for Beck, they'd include music CDs with certain volumes. These would feature various indie bands in Japan. And it was appropriate since Beck was all about the struggles of making a band, keeping it together, and trying to make a living of it. Making a successful band is quite an accomplishment. In general, not everyone likes each other, but if there's a common goal, and everyone agrees to tolerate each other, they can make it work. And it's not always the best musicians that succeed. It's basically the ones that find the formula that works, and by that I mean, good music, but also people that can work together as a team even if they don't really like each other. It's a business after all at the end of the day. Just finding members is hard (harder if you want to do an all girl band.) It's easy to think "oh, you're a drummer and we need a drummer, let's be in the same band" but that's not how it works. Everyone has their own vision of what band they want to make. So everyone is clashing and have to make compromises for a band to succeed. If they can touch on this with Josie, it COULD be interesting even if you don't head music. We'll see!

Well, if they wanted to get a little crazy with their venture capital funding, ACP could try to start something that might eventually grow into a media phenomenon. Do what the Hanna-Barbera studio originally did, and create a band by hiring talented unknowns to play the roles of Josie, Melody, and Valerie, and hire proven songwriters to write the music. Make some music videos and put them up on YouTube and anywhere else willing to host them. Have the band appear at SDCC and other major comic cons. Offer a downloadable MP3 album to tie into the existing comic book, really try to get some attention and publicity, and maybe they could get some interest going in either a new animated show or a live action one. Maybe include a CD (or just some redemption code) with a trade paperback collection of J&TP.

I see what you're saying about the band experience and putting those kind of details in gives it verisimilitude and makes the characters seem more real to people. At the same time, it can't be about *just* the band experience, because then it seems like you're catering the comic specifically to the audience that can relate because they ARE in a band, have BEEN in a band, or would LIKE to be in a band. That kind of reader probably has her own musical soundtrack in her head as far as what kind of band they are, and what kind of music they're playing. It's a lot harder for the average, non-musician to supply that background soundtrack in her or his head, so it's not connecting as much with those readers. Fans of bands like KISS or The Ramones are going to buy a comic (assuming they read comics) with them in it, and fans of classic Archie will buy it because of that. But unless you're a BIG Archie fan, if you DON'T like the music of KISS or The Ramones, you'd be kind of resistant to buying it. For the people who aren't familiar with the band experience, they need some other stuff in there, probably some unrealistic comedy or fantasy or adventure elements. But it really helps if there's SOME kind of actual music that people can mentally connect to the comic book.

I never really heard of Beck* or Nana (well, not the Japanese manga ones, anyway), but I have the soundtrack (4 CDs) to the Cowboy Bebop anime by The Seatbelts. It's awesome.


* = '90s alternative artist known for "I'm a loser baby, so why don't you kill me"
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 07:08:56 AM by DeCarlo Rules »

Gisele

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon. With stuff like KISS, The Archies, and Josie and the Pussycats, I know what they sound like because I've heard the music, but just trying to imagine music that you've never heard before doesn't work. Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television. The Josie animated cartoon didn't rely on music as much as adventures, and the original comic book tended to concentrate less on their life as a band than on just their day-to-day situations.

In regards to Nana and Beck, they eventually did an animation and a soundtrack for both (highly recommended.) Also, for Beck, they'd include music CDs with certain volumes. These would feature various indie bands in Japan. And it was appropriate since Beck was all about the struggles of making a band, keeping it together, and trying to make a living of it. Making a successful band is quite an accomplishment. In general, not everyone likes each other, but if there's a common goal, and everyone agrees to tolerate each other, they can make it work. And it's not always the best musicians that succeed. It's basically the ones that find the formula that works, and by that I mean, good music, but also people that can work together as a team even if they don't really like each other. It's a business after all at the end of the day. Just finding members is hard (harder if you want to do an all girl band.) It's easy to think "oh, you're a drummer and we need a drummer, let's be in the same band" but that's not how it works. Everyone has their own vision of what band they want to make. So everyone is clashing and have to make compromises for a band to succeed. If they can touch on this with Josie, it COULD be interesting even if you don't head music. We'll see!

Well, if they wanted to get a little crazy with their venture capital funding, ACP could try to start something that might eventually grow into a media phenomenon. Do what the Hanna-Barbera studio originally did, and create a band by hiring talented unknowns to play the roles of Josie, Melody, and Valerie, and hire proven songwriters to write the music. Make some music videos and put them up on YouTube and anywhere else willing to host them. Have the band appear at SDCC and other major comic cons. Offer a downloadable MP3 album to tie into the existing comic book, really try to get some attention and publicity, and maybe they could get some interest going in either a new animated show or a live action one. Maybe include a CD (or just some redemption code) with a trade paperback collection of J&TP.

I see what you're saying about the band experience and putting those kind of details in gives it verisimilitude and makes the characters seem more real to people. At the same time, it can't be about *just* the band experience, because then it seems like you're catering the comic specifically to the audience that can relate because they ARE in a band, have BEEN in a band, or would LIKE to be in a band. That kind of reader probably has her own musical soundtrack in her head as far as what kind of band they are, and what kind of music they're playing. It's a lot harder for the average, non-musician to supply that background soundtrack in her or his head, so it's not connecting as much with those readers. Fans of bands like KISS or The Ramones are going to buy a comic (assuming they read comics) with them in it, and fans of classic Archie will buy it because of that. But unless you're a BIG Archie fan, if you DON'T like the music of KISS or The Ramones, you'd be kind of resistant to buying it. For the people who aren't familiar with the band experience, they need some other stuff in there, probably some unrealistic comedy or fantasy or adventure elements. But it really helps if there's SOME kind of actual music that people can mentally connect to the comic book.

I never really heard of Beck* or Nana (well, not the Japanese manga ones, anyway), but I have the soundtrack (4 CDs) to the Cowboy Bebop anime by The Seatbelts. It's awesome.


* = '90s alternative artist known for "I'm a loser baby, so why don't you kill me"

I agree that it can't be all about the band experience. It's like watching a show set at the hospital, or at a police station, etc. It's more about the lives of these people. The hospital, the police station, or a stage is just a setting and helps create stories. The Japanese are good at this stuff when it comes to comics. They have comics on everything. Want to become a world famous cook? There's a comic on that, and even if you don't care to become a world famous cook, they make it so interesting to read, that anyone will enjoy it. I think this is roughly what needs to happen here with Josie.

I highly recommend Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Whether it's via the manga or anime. Be aware going in that Nana is a josei (aimed at the working woman vs the teenage girl.) I know many men still enjoy it, so you still might like it. Beck is a shonen (for boys) but it's pretty mature, and not all about power-ups à la Dragon Ball.
I'm a cartoonist! http://www.giselelagace.com

irishmoxie

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon.

They already do this with apps such as Webtoon. Siren's Lament has its own piano score which is actually quite good. Cassette tapes were included with some of the Jem and the Holograms dolls.

Quote
Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television.

They did do this. Everything's Archie is pretty much The Archies comic book series. Also they appeared in Life With Archie a lot.

irishmoxie

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon. With stuff like KISS, The Archies, and Josie and the Pussycats, I know what they sound like because I've heard the music, but just trying to imagine music that you've never heard before doesn't work. Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television. The Josie animated cartoon didn't rely on music as much as adventures, and the original comic book tended to concentrate less on their life as a band than on just their day-to-day situations.

In regards to Nana and Beck, they eventually did an animation and a soundtrack for both (highly recommended.) Also, for Beck, they'd include music CDs with certain volumes. These would feature various indie bands in Japan. And it was appropriate since Beck was all about the struggles of making a band, keeping it together, and trying to make a living of it. Making a successful band is quite an accomplishment. In general, not everyone likes each other, but if there's a common goal, and everyone agrees to tolerate each other, they can make it work. And it's not always the best musicians that succeed. It's basically the ones that find the formula that works, and by that I mean, good music, but also people that can work together as a team even if they don't really like each other. It's a business after all at the end of the day. Just finding members is hard (harder if you want to do an all girl band.) It's easy to think "oh, you're a drummer and we need a drummer, let's be in the same band" but that's not how it works. Everyone has their own vision of what band they want to make. So everyone is clashing and have to make compromises for a band to succeed. If they can touch on this with Josie, it COULD be interesting even if you don't head music. We'll see!

Well, if they wanted to get a little crazy with their venture capital funding, ACP could try to start something that might eventually grow into a media phenomenon. Do what the Hanna-Barbera studio originally did, and create a band by hiring talented unknowns to play the roles of Josie, Melody, and Valerie, and hire proven songwriters to write the music. Make some music videos and put them up on YouTube and anywhere else willing to host them. Have the band appear at SDCC and other major comic cons. Offer a downloadable MP3 album to tie into the existing comic book, really try to get some attention and publicity, and maybe they could get some interest going in either a new animated show or a live action one. Maybe include a CD (or just some redemption code) with a trade paperback collection of J&TP.

I see what you're saying about the band experience and putting those kind of details in gives it verisimilitude and makes the characters seem more real to people. At the same time, it can't be about *just* the band experience, because then it seems like you're catering the comic specifically to the audience that can relate because they ARE in a band, have BEEN in a band, or would LIKE to be in a band. That kind of reader probably has her own musical soundtrack in her head as far as what kind of band they are, and what kind of music they're playing. It's a lot harder for the average, non-musician to supply that background soundtrack in her or his head, so it's not connecting as much with those readers. Fans of bands like KISS or The Ramones are going to buy a comic (assuming they read comics) with them in it, and fans of classic Archie will buy it because of that. But unless you're a BIG Archie fan, if you DON'T like the music of KISS or The Ramones, you'd be kind of resistant to buying it. For the people who aren't familiar with the band experience, they need some other stuff in there, probably some unrealistic comedy or fantasy or adventure elements. But it really helps if there's SOME kind of actual music that people can mentally connect to the comic book.

I never really heard of Beck* or Nana (well, not the Japanese manga ones, anyway), but I have the soundtrack (4 CDs) to the Cowboy Bebop anime by The Seatbelts. It's awesome.


* = '90s alternative artist known for "I'm a loser baby, so why don't you kill me"

I agree that it can't be all about the band experience. It's like watching a show set at the hospital, or at a police station, etc. It's more about the lives of these people. The hospital, the police station, or a stage is just a setting and helps create stories. The Japanese are good at this stuff when it comes to comics. They have comics on everything. Want to become a world famous cook? There's a comic on that, and even if you don't care to become a world famous cook, they make it so interesting to read, that anyone will enjoy it. I think this is roughly what needs to happen here with Josie.

I highly recommend Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Whether it's via the manga or anime. Be aware going in that Nana is a josei (aimed at the working woman vs the teenage girl.) I know many men still enjoy it, so you still might like it. Beck is a shonen (for boys) but it's pretty mature, and not all about power-ups à la Dragon Ball.

Nana is one of my all time favorites. I even liked the live action movie. You should write a series combining Josie and the Pussycats and Nana!

DeCarlo Rules

Maybe they never felt they found the right team for it? Comics that feature music are not an easy sell in the States as they are in Europe and Japan, where they are liked and popular there. As a musician myself, my favorite comics that feature music are Beck (Mongolian Chop Squad) and Nana. Both are Japanese properties. Harold Sakuishi, who did Beck, REALLY did his research. I believe he was in bands too. The instruments look great, the stories are believable, AND it's FUNNY. Let's hope we get that with Josie.

Maybe it's because in a comic book, you can't hear the music. That's an inherently limiting factor of the medium, unless digital comics start including soundtracks (too expensive, I know). I've SEEN Jem and the Holograms in a comic book, but I haven't the foggiest idea what the band sounds like. Never saw the animated cartoon.

They already do this with apps such as Webtoon. Siren's Lament has its own piano score which is actually quite good. Cassette tapes were included with some of the Jem and the Holograms dolls.

Quote
Thinking about it the other day, I wondered why ACP never published a comic book series about The Archies. Maybe that's why, although it doesn't explain why they didn't do it during the time period when the albums were being released. Maybe because they were already on television.

They did do this. Everything's Archie is pretty much The Archies comic book series. Also they appeared in Life With Archie a lot.

I know that The Archies started OUT in Life With Archie, but that was actually the pre-television version of The Archies. I don't know that they were in many issues after the TV series was airing, so we're talking maybe a dozen or so at most?

Everything's Archie, the entire series? Like every single issue? That was a long-running series (160 issues), and they appear on very few of the covers (looking at GCD), which seems kind of odd.

Unless somebody put it on YouTube or converted it to MP3s, old cassettes from the late 80s aren't exactly an accessible source for getting an idea of what the Holograms sound like. Did the original cartoons have whole songs, or just snippets?

I thought the JEM comic was sort of reboot of the original animated cartoon. But they did some kind of flash-animated versions of the comic stories, is that what you're saying? With a music soundtrack by the band, but it's piano music? I'm not quite understanding.
« Last Edit: July 02, 2016, 04:30:07 PM by DeCarlo Rules »

 


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