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New Sabrina comic book miniseries (non-horror) by DeCarlo Rules
[Today at 01:28:13 am]


What comics have you been reading? by rusty
[November 15, 2018, 12:59:56 am]


What are you currently watching? by BettyReggie
[November 14, 2018, 03:39:33 pm]


Days we look foward to as Archie Fans. by BettyReggie
[November 14, 2018, 03:37:27 pm]


Library Books That You All Read by BettyReggie
[November 14, 2018, 03:33:32 pm]


Stan Lee has died by DeCarlo Rules
[November 13, 2018, 11:34:58 am]


Riverdale Reviewed by Tuxedo Mark
[November 11, 2018, 07:04:36 pm]


Sears/Kmart by DeCarlo Rules
[November 11, 2018, 03:48:37 am]


Features by Oldiesmann
[November 10, 2018, 10:21:28 pm]


WARNING about Palladous the freelance writing company by BillysBadFurDay
[October 26, 2018, 04:58:52 am]

* Shoutbox

Refresh History
  • Oldiesmann: RIP Stan Lee :( [link]
    November 12, 2018, 02:04:24 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "Fashion Emergency" from Cherl Blossom #26: [link]
    November 11, 2018, 07:05:28 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Internet outage for nearly 24 hours, but I'm back now. :)
    November 09, 2018, 05:37:49 pm
  • rusty: That is hilarious.
    November 04, 2018, 02:36:07 pm
  • DeCarlo Rules: The funniest thing I've seen all year (and maybe ever)... [link]  :2funny:
    November 04, 2018, 07:12:01 am
  • DeCarlo Rules: It's crazy that ACP hasn't reprinted those 2 issues as a double-size one-shot. Or the lead story in a TP collection of vampire stories (including "Twilite" and others).
    November 04, 2018, 03:21:35 am
  • irishmoxie: That's crazy about those Betty and Veronica issues being worth so much. They're only about 6 years old. I'm pretty sure I have copies of them.
    November 04, 2018, 01:36:00 am
  • DeCarlo Rules: On a relatated note, the real FIRST Vampironica appeared in Larry Welz' underground comic Cherry Poptart #1 [link]. That can be had right now, CGCed at 9.4, at the Buy-It-Now price of $280 on ebay. Although the book had several subsequent printings, only the first printing ($2 cover price) contains the Vampironica story. Much, much scarcer than B&V #261 & 262, but then far fewer people seem to be aware of its existence. It may not be the same Vampironica as the one that appears in her own comic book from ACP, but then you can easily make the argument that neither is the Vampironica from B&V 261-262.
    November 04, 2018, 01:15:09 am
  • rusty: Crazy.  I obviously missed that back then.
    November 03, 2018, 10:06:11 pm
  • DeCarlo Rules: Yes, I mentioned this a while back somewhere around the time Vampironica #1 was first solicted or shipped. I even mentioned it to Dan Parent and told him if he still had copies he should get them CGC'ed.
    November 03, 2018, 04:33:03 pm
  • rusty: Apparently Betty and Veronica #261 and 262 (1987 series) are popular now due to Vampironica.  Somebody actually purchased a copy of #261 for $299 on ebay recently.
    November 03, 2018, 01:41:51 pm
  • archiecomicscollector: I've been watching Chilling Adventures of Sabrina on Netflix...so no Riverdale means more time in Greendale :)
    November 01, 2018, 10:17:35 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Quite easy. I don't need a new episode every single week.
    November 01, 2018, 09:05:48 pm
  • BettyReggie: How did everyone survive with no Riverdale last Wednesday?
    November 01, 2018, 03:56:28 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: My reviews of the Cheryl stories Psyc-Out [link] Take the Mummy and Run! [link] and A Midsummer's Magic [link]
    October 31, 2018, 10:15:29 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Oh, and there's no "The" in the title.
    October 30, 2018, 10:52:11 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: Just on Netflix for now.
    October 30, 2018, 10:51:44 pm
  • BettyReggie: I can't find The Chilling Adventures Of Sabrina on Netflix. Is it just streaming or is it in discs YOU can rent?
    October 30, 2018, 02:17:31 pm
  • Tuxedo Mark: LOL! Nice! A bit too pricey, though: [link]
    October 30, 2018, 01:44:46 pm
  • Oldiesmann: Site is fixed now. Security certificate expired.
    October 24, 2018, 10:23:54 pm


Author Topic: What comics have you been reading?  (Read 320223 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

DeCarlo Rules

Re: What comics have you been reading?
« Reply #1425 on: June 01, 2018, 02:46:18 am »
ARCHIE 3000! #2 (Jul 1989)
JUGHEAD #4 (Feb 1988)
JUGHEAD'S DINER (1990) #5, 7
DILTON'S STRANGE SCIENCE (1989-90) #2, #4
VERONICA (1989) #2, 3, 4, 5
ARCHIE'S T.V. LAUGH-OUT #77
(Jul 1980)
LAUGH (Vol. 2, 1988-90) #3, 6, 12, 16, 19 - You know, I never really cared for the first volume of LAUGH. While you can undoubtedly find some issues in the run that contain some notable stories, there was never anything that stood out as a regular feature to distinguish that title -- just a mostly-bland hodge-podge of run-of-the-mill stories featuring Archie and the gang. Same goes for PEP, except for issues from a few years in the 1960s, where you could find some Josie, The Fly, Fly-Girl, or Jaguar stories. On the other hand, I always loved ARCHIE'S T.V. LAUGH-OUT (and pick them up whenever I can find them) because it consistently featured both Sabrina and Josie stories. It finally dawned on me after reading enough issues that the second volume of LAUGH was really more of a continuation of T.V. LAUGH-OUT (even though that title had ended its run an entire year earlier, and Volume 1 of LAUGH had then picked up a few Sabrina stories in some issues during the interim) than it was of the first volume of LAUGH, because LAUGH Vol. 2 consistently featured both Sabrina and Josie stories, just as T.V. LAUGH-OUT had. The T.V. LAUGH-OUT title had launched in 1969 when The Archies, Sabrina, and Josie were all starring in animated series on television, but the name of the comic, having been originally inspired as a take-off on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, must have seemed really dated by 1986 when it was cancelled.  The other consistent feature in every issue of LAUGH Volume 2 (never an ongoing feature in any other title) is "The Mighty Archie Art Players". This feature had appeared sporadically in a few random issues of other titles (the earliest I could find is in REGGIE AND ME #68, Jan. 1974), and was really just a way of grouping all those random Archie stories which took place in other times and places under one heading, with a slight skew towards literary or film parodies. Some similar concepts like Archie 1 (the gang as prehistoric cave-people), Archie the Barbarian, or Starship Rivdale had made strings of appearances elsewhere (in LIFE WITH ARCHIE or EVERYTHING'S ARCHIE) before, as well. But in The Mighty Archie Art Players we never really see any framing device to the stories where our "players" appear out of character and/or behind the scenes as actors, so they could all have been stand-alone stories appearing randomly in different titles, rather than a "series" connected by nothing more than a loose concept. Still, some of these are kind of fun. Volume 2 of LAUGH had a fairly short run of only 29 issues, so I'm going to see how many of this run I can manage to collect. They seem a lot less scarce than older issues of JOSIE or SABRINA, or even T.V. LAUGH-OUT.

BETTY AND ME #111, 112, 153, 162, 170, 176
BETTY'S DIARY #3
(Aug 1986)
BETTY AND VERONICA SPECTACULAR (Archie Giant Series) #559 (Jun 1986), #575 (Oct 1987)
Archie's Girls BETTY AND VERONICA (1950) #290, 296, 299 (1980); #343, 344 (1986)
BETTY AND VERONICA (1987) #23 (Sep 1989)

BETTY AND VERONICA JUMBO COMICS DIGEST #263 - Good issue. Notable stories include 1990s Sabrina by DeCarlo, classic 1960s Doyle/DeCarlo BETTY AND ME stories, Part 1 (of 5) of the reader-voted "And The Winner Is..." where Cheryl appears on the TV dating game show Lonely Hearts Club (no appearance by the band, too bad), and weirdly, two different Dan Parent stories where Veronica attempts to go from home to school (one just a normal school day, the second for the prom) in the private Lodge helicopter. [Spoilers: she doesn't make it.] Too bad this issue arrived in the mail two weeks late.


FLEX ARMSTRONG & THE FLEX FIGHTERS #1-3 (of 3)
KILL OR BE KILLED #19 (of 20)
SAVAGE DRAGON #234
RICK & MORTY #38
VAMPIRONICA #2
- I have to admit I liked the second issue better than the first. There was a lot less action, but a lot more story, and somewhat intelligently scripted, in addition to being well-drawn, by the Smallwoods. As much as I have a natural resistance to the idea of totally reinventing the Archie characters in this genre, I would probably have to admit that this could be the best of the Archie Horror titles so far. It even manages to be a better female vampire heroine story than the last couple of attempts by Dynamite at presenting Vampirella in a series. If it manages to to actually ship on a regular, consistent basis this could become one of ACP's best selling, and longest-running titles.

JUDGE DREDD: UNDER SIEGE #1
INFINITY COUNTDOWN: CAPTAIN MARVEL #1
(one-shot)
MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #6
LOCKJAW #4
(of 4)

DOOMSDAY CLOCK #5 (of 12)
JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE #4 (of 4) - It was really odd reading these two titles (both of which supposedly take place in the 'mainstream' DC universe) back to back, because it really highlights the contrast. The two titles just don't feel like they take place in the same universe, despite them featuring a lot of the same DC characters. I mean, yes, it's obvious that if they were taking place in the same universe, the two stories couldn't be taking place concurrent to each other -- one would have to begin and end prior to the other. Yet because of the nature of the backstory connections and what No Justice leads immediately into, it feels like it's more part of the current DC mainstream universe (three new ongoing JUSTICE LEAGUE series will spin off the events of NO JUSTICE). It seemed to start off great from a conceptual POV, with the introduction of a big cosmic menace to the whole universe, which can only be defeated by disassembling the all of the current DC hero teams, and dividing them up again into four new Justice League teams with key supervillains as part of the line-ups -- all overseen with the help of Brainiac, the only one smart enough to figure things out, and how to defeat the big cosmic threat.  And of course, there's immediate chaos among the heroes and conflict over the "but can we trust him?" factor. The first three issues of No Justice were all a build-up in tension, whereas the last one just seems like the threat was resolved far too easily -- a real deus ex machina ending. We are assured by the characters in the story, however, that the universe has been irrevocably changed and will never be the same after these events. It didn't feel too convincing to me. By where it left off at the end of issue #3, it seems like the plot/storyline hadn't even quite reached the half-point of development, and it felt like the series should have taken its time to play things out over at least 6 issues, if not 8 or 12. Events were set into motion by something (the breaking of the Source Wall) which occurred in the earlier event series METAL (which I didn't read past the first couple of issues because it was so convoluted). I blame Scott Snyder, who masterminded both METAL and this (although DC employed other writers to actually script from Snyder's plot). I didn't care for Snyder's take on Batman, and I don't care for the idea of DC making him the 'architect' of its universe.

DOOMSDAY CLOCK, on the other hand, is a sequel to WATCHMEN (1986), DC's most-reprinted graphic novel collection, and is written by Geoff Johns. For a number of years prior to the 2011 New 52 DC reboot, Johns had been the mastermind behind revitalizing a number of DC's character franchises that had gone fallow, including JSA/Justice Society of America, Hawkman, Teen Titans, Green Lantern (with GL: Rebirth), Flash (beginning with FLASH: Rebirth, that brought back the dead-since-CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS Barry Allen Flash), Superman (with SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN and a run in ACTION COMICS), Booster Gold (in collaboration with BG's creator, Dan Jurgens), and the CRISIS sequel INFINTE CRISIS, as well as the line-wide GL-centric big event series DARKEST NIGHT and its sequel BRIGHTEST DAY. Despite also being the writer of the execrable (but best-selling) editorially-concocted FLASHPOINT, which destroyed the remnants of the old DCU and led into the New 52 reboot, Johns was then promoted to the position of DC's Chief Creative Officer, and given the flagship New 52 JUSTICE LEAGUE to insure a strong backbone series for the N52 relaunch -- but since giving it up the writing on JL last year, it's not surprising that last year's relaunch/refresh (but not a reBOOT, per se) of DC's main universe was rolled out under the REBIRTH banner for all their main universe titles. Johns wrote the introductory one-shot REBIRTH issue, which hinted at the arrival in the mainstream DCU of survivors from the WATCHMEN universe, and followed up last year with a four-part crossover in BATMAN and FLASH tying together plot threads from FLASHPOINT with both WATCHMEN and the general scheme of the current state of reality across the DC Multiverse. Which brings us to DOOMSDAY CLOCK, with a handful of Watchmen refugees (Ozymandias, Dr. Manhattan, Nite-Owl, Rorschach, and The Comedian, as well as a few minor characters) appearing to shake things up in the regular DCU. It feels carefully written, and evocative of the general tone and style of the original WATCHMEN, but somehow seems at odds with the general feel of DC's current line. Things here, as in WATCHMEN, are handled in more of a real-world way, with the rise of a populist backlash to superheroes in general, according to a belief in what is called "The Superman Theory", a conspiracy claim that the vast numbers of superheroes (in the U.S., particularly) is attributable to the fact that most superheroes are, in fact, products of a secret government plan to create a metahuman army, stimulating metagene-positive individuals by exposure to various traumatic conditions in order to activate their latent superpowers. All well and good, but it really doesn't seem to fit with the general ethos of the DCU. Why would the public suddenly become suspicious and hostile towards superheroes after years of them being around? The lesson to be learned from the orignal WATCHMEN is that too much grim and gritty reality undermines the basic fantasy element necessary for the suspension of disbelief that allows an entire fantastic genre of superheroes to exist in ongoing monthly adventures; if there is change in the DCU, it is mostly of the illusory sort -- i.e., the changes are temporary and reversible, according to the whims of editors, writers, and consumer reactions. In the Watchmen universe, designed to adhere more closely to the real world as its basic premise, consequences of actions and the impact on the status quo is permanent and irreversible. Dead is dead, if you saw the body buried. In the DCU, Superman, Batman, Robin, Green Lantern, Flash, Hawkman, and Wonder Woman have all died at least once (and in some cases, multiple times) but are still around, and none the worse for wear, still ready to do their jobs of selling more comic book stories every month, even if they sometimes got a temporary time-out to be replaced by someone else carrying the names and wearing the costumes. Since we know that, unlike the original Watchmen, the DCU characters must go on and on in monthly adventures, after the conclusion of this series, rather than being irrevocably altered by the impact of events in this self-contained storyline, one might wonder what exactly is the point of the plot, here? Well, to sell comic books, obviously -- but can there ever be any really satisfying conclusion to this story? One wonders, too, where are the original Charlton Comics characters (owned by DC Comics since 1985) on whom the Watchmen were based -- Captain Atom (Dr. Manhattan), The Blue Beetle (Nite-Owl), The Question (Rorschach), Peacemaker (The Comedian), and Thunderbolt (Ozymandias)? While they have kept a relatively low profile in the DCU since 1985 as second-string heroes, it would be fascinating to see them by comparison and contrast to their darker/more realist counterparts from Watchmen. Little things about the DCU just seem kind of "off" in DOOMSDAY CLOCK, like the former villainess Killer Frost (as recent as a couple of months ago, now a member of the Justice League of America) making an appearance, looking totally different (in fact, her appearance in DOOMSDAY CLOCK goes back to her original look created for FIRESTORM in the 1980s, while her current DCU appearance is quite a bit altered since then). Batman is wearing the yellow-circled bat-emblem on his costume that he hasn't worn in years now. Superman already has his red shorts back, even before Brian Michael Bendis arrived at DC to restore them in the new MAN OF STEEL miniseries. None of that will matter to the many readers who'll be reading this story in a later collected edition -- readers who've read Watchmen but are not regular followers of the current DC line. And perhaps the series was designed to be so, as opposed to seamlessly blending with the current stream of DC's mainstream universe reality.

Manga:
  SAINT SEIYA: SAINTIA SHO VOL 02 [tankobon Pb] - This is another manga which is a cosmic/mythological science-fantasy action saga (a spinoff of the popular 1980s/90s Shonen Jump series Saint Seiya, known in translation as KNIGHTS OF THE ZODIAC) in the general vein of Jack Kirby's THOR or THE NEW GODS, or Jim Starlin's various cosmic superhero sagas with Thanos. The goddess Athena has been reborn on earth after many centuries, and is beginning her process of 'awakening' in the body of a young Japanese woman, in anticipation of the coming Galaxian Wars. The evil Eris, goddess of discord, has also been similarly reborn into the body of an earthwoman and is awakening to her full power. Athena is dedicated to preserving justice, and devoted to protecting mankind from the machinations of the gods, and so a cadre of guardian-warriors have been recruited to wear special metallic 'cloth', a kind of body armor capable of reconfiguring itself independently of its user, and become Athena's "Saints", her personal bodyguards until she awakens fully to her powers, and afterwards her private army to defeat the evil being sown among humans on earth by Eris and her confederates. Saints must develop their innate 'cosmo' which is a kind of psychically-deployed means of transmuting matter and energy, in order to wear the sacred cloths based on various zodiacal signs, and best serve Athena in her battle to protect humanity from destruction.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2018, 05:25:05 am by DeCarlo Rules »

 


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