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What comics have you been reading? by DeCarlo Rules
[Today at 01:14:33 AM]


Days we look foward to as Archie Fans. by BettyReggie
[June 20, 2018, 05:26:49 PM]


What have you done today? by Archiecomicxfan215
[June 20, 2018, 12:55:56 AM]


ARCHIE COMICS FOR NOVEMBER 2017 by Tough guy21
[June 19, 2018, 01:52:27 PM]


Library Books That You All Read by BettyReggie
[June 18, 2018, 03:06:01 PM]


What is to become of me and my collection? by JanaRonnie
[June 18, 2018, 05:16:32 AM]


Archie and Jughead in Winter Christmas Double Date by JanaRonnie
[June 18, 2018, 05:16:24 AM]


Archie & Me: Prank Attack by PTF
[June 17, 2018, 01:42:19 PM]


Super Suckers: That Lady is a Real Witch by PTF
[June 17, 2018, 12:52:44 PM]


Betty and Veronica Vixens coming to an end with issue 10 by DeCarlo Rules
[June 16, 2018, 02:26:26 PM]

* Shoutbox

Refresh History
  • BettyReggie: 112 Days until Wednesday 10th 2018 ,  Riverdale Season #3 on The CW at 8pm.
    June 20, 2018, 05:28:15 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: And another one: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:42:07 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: Riverdale spoof: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:35:22 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "Roughing It!" from B&V Friends #262: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:12:53 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: @irishmoxie -- It's definitely complete. All six of the 1958-59 Sy Reit/Bob White original issues, plus the feature-length "Good Guys of the Galaxy" by Tom DeFalco & Fernando Ruiz from ARCHIE #655, and three 5-page digest shorts that guest-starred Cosmo -- and the complete first issue of the Ian Flynn/Tracy Yarley COSMO (2017) thrown in for good measure. It follows the same layout/format as the previous JUGHEAD'S TIME POLICE, even though that didn't carry the "Archie Comics Presents..." trade dress. Not a bad buy for $11.
    June 14, 2018, 01:08:59 AM
  • irishmoxie: Anyone get the Cosmo book that came out today? Any good?
    June 13, 2018, 08:04:49 PM
  • Cosmo: Ah man....and I was worried I was the last enthusiast for ERB's stuff. I'm currently rereading my Dell Tarzan books. Really good fun! It took a while to complete that run.
    June 12, 2018, 06:51:53 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: ...Marvel's earlier JOHN CARTER, WARLORD OF MARS in there, so the DE Tarzan comics need to go in a different box, and SHEENA (also a recent DE title) and DC's RIMA THE JUNGLE GIRL will help fill up that box.
    June 11, 2018, 07:40:48 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Recently. DE's unauthorized LORD OF THE JUNGLE Tarzan adaptations (and its authorized THE GREATEST ADVENTURE) won't fit into my existing box of previous Tarzan comics from Gold Key, DC, and Dark Horse, so I have to start a new box. Logically these get filed with DE's unauthorized WARLORD OF MARS comics (including DEJAH THORIS) and their authorized JOHN CARTER, WARLORD OF MARS. But I also want to squeeze Marve;
    June 11, 2018, 07:38:48 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Interesting. I tend not to group titles by publisher at all, if the characters were not created as work-for-hire (meaning the publisher is legally considered the 'author' of the character). Do they belong to that publisher's "universe" (assuming it has one)? There are some publishers like Dynamite Entertainment where the vast majority of the titles they publish are licensed, and thus were "inherited" from other publishers. Therefore it makes more sense to me to group them together in boxes with similar characters. Flash Gordon, The Phantom, and Mandrake comics (regardless of who the actual publisher was) go together in the same box because they're all classic adventure heroes licensed from Hearst Entertainment (formerly King Features Syndicate). Pulp fiction heroes like The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Spider (regardless of the fact that the latter did not originate with the same publisher as the first two) also get grouped together. Space considerations allowing, Tarzan (and other Edgar Rice Burroughs adaptations) might share the same box with Sheena and Rima, but NOT with Ka-Zar, because he's a Marvel Universe character.
    June 11, 2018, 07:16:22 PM
  • rusty: I do keep all Star Trek series together in their own section and all Star Wars books together.  I also keep all 2000AD titles together and manga books get their own section.  For titles that have switched publishers, I usually keep them all with the publisher that I identify them with the most.  Tarzan has been published by a variety of publishers, but I keep them with Dell/Gold Key.  Conan is starting to get a bit close with all the success Dark Horse has had, but I still identify Conan more with Marvel.
    June 11, 2018, 06:27:26 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Believe it or not, I even have a box labeled "Pseudo-manga" that contains comics published by American companies and created by American creators like Astro Boy & Racer X (Now Comics), Battle of the Planets (Gold Key & Top Cow/Image), Captain Harlock (Malibu), Godzilla (Dark Horse) and Ultraman. I just want to keep those separate from the boxes of real translated manga in floppy comic format.
    June 11, 2018, 03:34:17 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Well. the problem is when you get titles with licensed characters that aren't owned by the publisher. So if you collect Star Trek comics, you'd have different series published by Gold Key, Marvel, DC, and IDW (and I probably missed one in there). It doesn't make sense to me to put them in different boxes by publisher, but to each his own. Disney comics would be another example. There are even some instances where if I like a certain artist enough, I will put all his work regardless of publisher or characters into one box, like Paul Gulacy, Steve Rude, or Mike Allred (and file them chronologically from older to newer, rather than alphabetically). Those are examples where my interest in the creator far exceeds my relative interest in whatever characters are involved.
    June 11, 2018, 03:14:29 PM
  • rusty: That makes sense.  There are many ways that people can file books.  What I do is file by company or category and then alphabetically within each section.  My first category is Richie Rich then Archie, then other Harvey titles, then Disney, then other humor/kids books, then by company (unless it is a company where I don't have very many books from them.  Star Trek and Star Wars each get their own section as well.  I will probably revamp a bit when I do my next major sort/merge.  The biggest section by far for me is DC.
    June 11, 2018, 09:28:59 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: I don't even file my comics alphabetically. I file them according to how closely they're related to other titles, but it's all dependent on the number of issues I have of any given title, and what will fit into a single box. Fpr ACP comics I just put all the short-run series (whether an actual miniseries or just a not particularly successful title) into one box. Even though some of those short run series star Jughead, and I could as easily file those together with the main JUGHEAD title in another box. For longer running ACP titles, "girl" titles are sorted into different boxes than "boy" titles. Eventually when I have enough issues of BETTY (and BETTY AND ME and BETTY'S DIARY) they'll get their own box, and VERONICA will get her own box.
    June 10, 2018, 09:49:06 AM
  • rusty: I file Jughead under J and Reggie under R in all of their incarnations, though I do file the original Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen books under S since that keeps them with the Superman books and also because they kept that title throughout their entire run.  If anyone wants to look up Jughead or Reggie in Overstreet, though, they will have to look under A for the early issues.
    June 10, 2018, 07:56:27 AM
  • BettyReggie: I can't wait to get that Reggie book. It's coming out the day after my 39th Birthday.
    June 10, 2018, 06:42:06 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Yeah, I never understood why publishers felt the need to point that out on the covers of a comic book, like maybe someone didn't really know who REGGIE was, and might buy it just because they noticed the words "Archie's Rival" above the big letters that spelled REGGIE? Same with "Archie's Pal" or "Superman's Pal" or "Superman's Girl Friend" -- like some potential buyer wouldn't know who Jughead, Jimmy Olsen, or Lois Lane was, but would know who Archie or Superman was? Just assume you're selling the product to idiots, I guess. Is anyone really filing REGGIE under "A" for Archie's Pal in their collections??
    June 10, 2018, 05:42:02 AM
  • rusty: In it's first incarnation, Reggie was titled ARCHIE'S RIVAL, REGGIE.  It wasn't until after the title was resurrected nearly a decade later that it became REGGIE and then REGGIE AND ME.
    June 09, 2018, 10:23:13 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: I've never understood why those old titles had "and Me" in them, anyway. Why not just name the titles after the starring characters?
    June 09, 2018, 08:17:45 PM

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Messages - DeCarlo Rules

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 47
1
The wise man is content in his own wisdom, and has no need or desire to prove anything to others or insist on the superiority of his own philosophy over theirs. The only thing he would prove is the hubris that attends his own flawed humanity.

2
Oh, not this again. Yes, no one understands the Meaning of Life. But somehow that doesn't stop people from preaching at others that their own understanding of the Meaning of Life is still better than mine. If you really want to do the world a big favor, make a funny movie about it like Monty Python did. At least they had a positive measurable impact by generating some laughs for people.

3
Bumping this thread because I updated the original post with comic shop release dates (scroll back to top of page).

4
I just pre-ordered all those "Archie Comics Presents..." TPs (well, up through LIFE WITH ARCHIE, which is as far ahead as Diamond Comics solicitations go so far) and Vol 4 of ARCHIE'S BIG BOOK. But that's the direct market comic shop ordering system. Meanwhile, the book trade obviously gets solicitations (which for typical trade collections is 3 to 4 months in advance of shipping dates in the direct market) far in advance of comic shops, so they are dangling products before our eyes that won't actually appear until January or February of 2019, seven or eight months from now. Presuming all human life on this planet isn't extinguished by a large asteroid collision in the the intervening time.

5
EDITED 06-10-18 to update release dates. Bookstore market release dates in BLUE, comic shop release dates in RED.
Items with no dates in red have not been solicited (as of 06-10) by Diamond Comics for the comic shop marketplace.

Archie Comics Presents... series:
  THE COMPLETE COSMO THE MERRY MARTIAN TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Jul 03, 2018 | Jun 13, 2018
  ARCHIE AT RIVERDALE HIGH VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Jul 10, 2018 | Jun 20, 2018
  BETTY AND VERONICA SPECTACULAR VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Aug 21, 2018 | Aug 1, 2018
  LIFE WITH ARCHIE VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Sep 18, 2018 | Aug 29, 2018
  ARCHIE AND ME VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Nov 13, 2018
  EVERYTHING'S ARCHIE VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Dec 11, 2018
  BETTY AND ME VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Jan 22, 2019
  REGGIE AND ME VOL. 1 TP | 224 Pages | 5-1/4 x 8 | $10.99 | Feb 19, 2019

Archie's Big Book series:
  ARCHIE'S BIG BOOK VOL. 4: FAIRY TALES TP | 304 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10 | $19.99 | Aug 14, 2018 | Jul 25, 2018
  ARCHIE'S BIG BOOK VOL. 5: ACTION ADVENTURE TP | 304 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10 | $19.99 | Jan 08, 2019

Best of Archie Comics series:
  THE BEST OF ARCHIE AMERICANA VOL. 3: BRONZE AGE 1980s-1990s TP | 416 Pages | 5-1/4 x 7-1/2 | $9.99 | Sep 04, 2018 | Aug 15, 2018
  THE BEST OF ARCHIE COMICS DELUXE EDITION BOOK THREE HC | 416 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | Oct 23, 2018

Archie Giant Comics Digest series:
  ARCHIE GIANT COMICS BASH TP | 416 Pages | 4-7/8 x 6-9/16 | $9.99 | Nov 27, 2018  *(NOTE - Page count reduced by 64; cover price increased by $2)

Archie 1000 Page Comics Digest series:
  ARCHIE 1000 PAGE COMICS ROMP TP | 1000 Pages | 4-7/8 x 6-9/16 | $14.99 | Oct 09, 2018

ARCHIE'S HOLIDAY COLORING BOOK TP | 128 Pages | 7-1/4 x 10-7/8 | $9.99 | Nov 06, 2018

ARCHIE MODERN CLASSICS VOL. 1: BEST OF 2018 TP | 256 Pages | 5-1/4 x 7-1/2 | $9.99 | Feb 05, 2019
  (The description in the solicition for this one is vague. Could be reprints of the new lead stories from 2018 digests, or something else altogether.)

ARCHIE: A CELEBRATION OF AMERICA'S FAVORITE TEENAGERS TP edited by Craig Yoe | 220 Pages | 8-1/2 x 11 | $29.99 | Oct 09, 2018 | Jul 25, 2018 
   -- A softcover reprint (with new cover) of the sold-out hardcover edition from 2011.

THE ARCHIES VOL 1 TP | 144 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $17.99 | Jun 19, 2018 | Available now (comic shops)

BETTY & VERONICA: VIXENS VOL. 1 TP | 136 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $14.99 | Jul 24, 2018 | Jul 04, 2018

JUGHEAD THE HUNGER VOL. 1 TP | 144 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $17.99 | Aug 07, 2018 | Jun 18, 2018

THE FOX VOL. 2: FOX HUNT TP | 136 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $14.99 | Sep 11, 2018 | Aug 22, 2018

COSMO VOL. 1: SPACE ACES TP | 128 Pages | 6 x 9 | $12.99 | Oct 16, 2018  (Collects Cosmo #1-5 by Ian Flynn & Tracy Yardley)

ARCHIE VOL. 6 TP | 144 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $17.99 | Oct 30, 2018

THE ARCHIES VOL 2 TP | 104 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $17.99 | Nov 20, 2018

BETTY & VERONICA: VIXENS VOL. 2 TP | 136 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $14.99 | Dec 04, 2018

CHILLING ADVENTURES OF SABRINA VOL. 2 TP | 176 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $19.99 | Dec 18, 2018

THE MIGHTY CRUSADERS VOL. 1 TP | 120 Pages | 6-5/8 x 10-3/16 | $12.99 | Jan 15, 2019  (Collects Mighty Crusaders 2017 #1-4 & Superteens vs. Crusaders #1-2)

6
Welcome/Introductions / Re: Archie Comics collector
« on: June 03, 2018, 04:57:40 AM »
I see you have a number of the Bantam mass-market paperbacks from the 1970s, and the Mike Pellowski RIVERDALE HIGH novels from the 1990s. Here's a list of some other ones you should be on the lookout for if you don't already have them:

Price Stern Sloan   BETTY & VERONICA Mad Libs by Roger Price and Leonard Stern   Sep-05   
Price Stern Sloan   ARCHIE loves BETTY & VERONICA Mad Libs by Roger Price and Leonard Stern   Dec-14   
         
Hyperion/Miramax Books   Are You A BETTY or VERONICA? - A Quiz Book   Apr-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   BETTY & VERONICA's Guide to Life by Jasmine Jones   Apr-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   BETTY & VERONICA: Best Friends Forever by Jasmine Jones   Jun-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   The Ultimate BETTY & VERONICA Quiz Book #2   Sep-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   BETTY & VERONICA Stories: What A Catch!  by Jasmine Jones   Oct-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   BETTY & VERONICA's Guide to Crushes by Emma Harrison   Dec-05   
Hyperion/Miramax Books   BETTY & VERONICA Stories: She's Got The Look  by Jasmine Jones   Apr-06   [ unpublished? ]
         
Cider Mill Press Books   BETTY AND VERONICA: A Girl's Guide to the 'Comic' World of Dating by Amy Helmes   Dec-06   
         
Grossett & Dunlap   xoxo, BETTY & VERONICA: Living the Dream by Christa Roberts   May-11   
Grossett & Dunlap   xoxo, BETTY & VERONICA: We're With The Band by Adrianne Ambrose   May-11   
Grossett & Dunlap   xoxo, BETTY & VERONICA: In Each Other's Shoes by Adrianne Ambrose   Sep-11   



A key vintage Archie collectible to find if you can would be the Post cereal boxes from the late 1960s that had The Archies singles printed right on the back of the boxes, and the later Kellogg's cereals Josie & the Pussycats singles. While they may seem quaint in this age of downloadable MP3 songs, it's important to remember that at the time they first appeared, the idea of giving away song recordings as a cereal prize represented a then-revolutionary new cutting-edge technology. Only recently had print technology reached the point where an extremely thin clear plastic sheet could be imprinted with sound recording grooves and adhered over a colorful cardboard box, that could then be cut out using scissors by kids and played just like a normal 45 RPM vinyl single.

The rarest, most pristine condition would be to find an unopened cereal box, completely intact and carefully preserved, but it's doubtful there are actually any extant examples of that case. Next in desirability would be just the box with the top flaps unsealed and the inner bag of cereal removed, but otherwise just as originally sold. Completely acceptable to most collectors though, would be the complete cereal box where both top and bottom flaps had been unsealed and the box carefully flattened. Much more commonly found would be examples where the free prize cardboard single had been cut from the box, played a few times, and then saved (but beware of surface scratches that might render the song unplayable). Still, the graphics are nice, and since the songs themselves are commonly available recordings, you won't really be playing the record. Where the value fluctuates a lot is in how carefully the detached record was cut from the box using scissors (some kids were extremely careful and neat... others, not so much), and the hole for the record player spindle needed to be punched in the exact center of the cardboard (or pretty close) for the record to play correctly. Also beware of misprints -- some of the songs don't match what the label on the disc says, because they were doing several different premiums on different cereal boxes and there exist examples where the factory got the wrong vinyl overlay stuck on the wrong cardboard backing. Even if you manage to find just a sloppily cut-out cardboard single where the surface of the vinyl is scratched and unplayable, as long as the graphics on the backing cardboard are intact, it's worth something.

7
Speaking of crossovers....I'd love to see CW's Supernatural crossover with Archie's Weird Mysteries, similar to their Scoobynatural episode earlier this year. I loved watching Archie's Weird Mysteries in the early 2000s.

I still say they need to do a crossover with the actual Scooby-Doo. I don't know if it would be a callback to Archie's Weird Mysteries (which did its own Scooby parody in one issue) because that was 18 years ago, and the TV series wasn't big enough to be that well-remembered by the wider public (as opposed to dyed-in-the-wool Archie fans), but that would be one of the most natural team-ups of all time.

The evolution of Scooby-Doo (the original Hanna-Barbera series) owes a lot to the success of Filmation's The Archie Show, with the basic H-B concept being that of a band (like the Archies) that would solve mysteries (like the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew), and the addition of a dog to the cast was almost an accidental afterthought. Except that Mystery Incorporated wound up not being a band after all, just background music during the chase scenes. Then when H-B finally wound up licensing the rights to actual Archie Comics characters, they decided to turn Josie and her friends (or at least Melody) into a mystery-solving band -- but the people at H-B apparently didn't like Pepper and Albert, so they replaced them with Valerie and Alan M. (note the suspicious similarity between Alan and Scooby's Fred Jones). I think the thought behind featuring Hot Dog and Scooby in those shows at that time (1968-69) was that animation studios still weren't confident in relying on animated humans for comedy in a show, and with cartoon pets, they felt more comfortable and could skew them more towards the more traditional anthropomorphic animal antics -- thus, Scooby could talk and we could hear what Hot Dog was thinking, like any traditional cartoon animal character.

8
Welcome/Introductions / Re: Archie Comics collector
« on: June 02, 2018, 07:12:01 AM »
Nice collection, Samantha! I have a few of the same things. The Archie Hot Wheels cars, the Betty and Veronica Toon Tumblers (I also have one of Josie & the Pussycats), the trading cards, a few pins, and of course a whole bunch of regular comic books and digests (and a ton of trade paperbacks and hardcovers). I haven't counted them, so I don't know how many. About four of those short comic boxes for the regular comics (and another one for Archie superhero comics like the Mighty Crusaders, The Fly/Fly-Man, The Jaguar, etc.). So how many is that? Maybe somewhere around 1200 regular comics, plus 6 or 7 boxes (the ones Diamond Comic Distributors ships comics in) of digests -- which again, I haven't counted, and maybe around 60 or 80 trade paperbacks & hardcovers.

Did you also get the Mattel Betty & Veronica dolls?  They're pretty nice.

9
General Discussion / Re: What comics have you been reading?
« on: June 01, 2018, 02:46:18 AM »
ARCHIE 3000! #2 (Jul 1989)
JUGHEAD #4 (Feb 1988)
JUGHEAD'S DINER (1990) #5, 7
DILTON'S STRANGE SCIENCE (1989-90) #2, #4
VERONICA (1989) #2, 3, 4, 5
ARCHIE'S T.V. LAUGH-OUT #77
(Jul 1980)
LAUGH (Vol. 2, 1988-90) #3, 6, 12, 16, 19 - You know, I never really cared for the first volume of LAUGH. While you can undoubtedly find some issues in the run that contain some notable stories, there was never anything that stood out as a regular feature to distinguish that title -- just a mostly-bland hodge-podge of run-of-the-mill stories featuring Archie and the gang. Same goes for PEP, except for issues from a few years in the 1960s, where you could find some Josie, The Fly, Fly-Girl, or Jaguar stories. On the other hand, I always loved ARCHIE'S T.V. LAUGH-OUT (and pick them up whenever I can find them) because it consistently featured both Sabrina and Josie stories. It finally dawned on me after reading enough issues that the second volume of LAUGH was really more of a continuation of T.V. LAUGH-OUT (even though that title had ended its run an entire year earlier, and Volume 1 of LAUGH had then picked up a few Sabrina stories in some issues during the interim) than it was of the first volume of LAUGH, because LAUGH Vol. 2 consistently featured both Sabrina and Josie stories, just as T.V. LAUGH-OUT had. The T.V. LAUGH-OUT title had launched in 1969 when The Archies, Sabrina, and Josie were all starring in animated series on television, but the name of the comic, having been originally inspired as a take-off on Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In, must have seemed really dated by 1986 when it was cancelled.  The other consistent feature in every issue of LAUGH Volume 2 (never an ongoing feature in any other title) is "The Mighty Archie Art Players". This feature had appeared sporadically in a few random issues of other titles (the earliest I could find is in REGGIE AND ME #68, Jan. 1974), and was really just a way of grouping all those random Archie stories which took place in other times and places under one heading, with a slight skew towards literary or film parodies. Some similar concepts like Archie 1 (the gang as prehistoric cave-people), Archie the Barbarian, or Starship Rivdale had made strings of appearances elsewhere (in LIFE WITH ARCHIE or EVERYTHING'S ARCHIE) before, as well. But in The Mighty Archie Art Players we never really see any framing device to the stories where our "players" appear out of character and/or behind the scenes as actors, so they could all have been stand-alone stories appearing randomly in different titles, rather than a "series" connected by nothing more than a loose concept. Still, some of these are kind of fun. Volume 2 of LAUGH had a fairly short run of only 29 issues, so I'm going to see how many of this run I can manage to collect. They seem a lot less scarce than older issues of JOSIE or SABRINA, or even T.V. LAUGH-OUT.

BETTY AND ME #111, 112, 153, 162, 170, 176
BETTY'S DIARY #3
(Aug 1986)
BETTY AND VERONICA SPECTACULAR (Archie Giant Series) #559 (Jun 1986), #575 (Oct 1987)
Archie's Girls BETTY AND VERONICA (1950) #290, 296, 299 (1980); #343, 344 (1986)
BETTY AND VERONICA (1987) #23 (Sep 1989)

BETTY AND VERONICA JUMBO COMICS DIGEST #263 - Good issue. Notable stories include 1990s Sabrina by DeCarlo, classic 1960s Doyle/DeCarlo BETTY AND ME stories, Part 1 (of 5) of the reader-voted "And The Winner Is..." where Cheryl appears on the TV dating game show Lonely Hearts Club (no appearance by the band, too bad), and weirdly, two different Dan Parent stories where Veronica attempts to go from home to school (one just a normal school day, the second for the prom) in the private Lodge helicopter. [Spoilers: she doesn't make it.] Too bad this issue arrived in the mail two weeks late.


FLEX ARMSTRONG & THE FLEX FIGHTERS #1-3 (of 3)
KILL OR BE KILLED #19 (of 20)
SAVAGE DRAGON #234
RICK & MORTY #38
VAMPIRONICA #2
- I have to admit I liked the second issue better than the first. There was a lot less action, but a lot more story, and somewhat intelligently scripted, in addition to being well-drawn, by the Smallwoods. As much as I have a natural resistance to the idea of totally reinventing the Archie characters in this genre, I would probably have to admit that this could be the best of the Archie Horror titles so far. It even manages to be a better female vampire heroine story than the last couple of attempts by Dynamite at presenting Vampirella in a series. If it manages to to actually ship on a regular, consistent basis this could become one of ACP's best selling, and longest-running titles.

JUDGE DREDD: UNDER SIEGE #1
INFINITY COUNTDOWN: CAPTAIN MARVEL #1
(one-shot)
MARVEL TWO-IN-ONE #6
LOCKJAW #4
(of 4)

DOOMSDAY CLOCK #5 (of 12)
JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE #4 (of 4) - It was really odd reading these two titles (both of which supposedly take place in the 'mainstream' DC universe) back to back, because it really highlights the contrast. The two titles just don't feel like they take place in the same universe, despite them featuring a lot of the same DC characters. I mean, yes, it's obvious that if they were taking place in the same universe, the two stories couldn't be taking place concurrent to each other -- one would have to begin and end prior to the other. Yet because of the nature of the backstory connections and what No Justice leads immediately into, it feels like it's more part of the current DC mainstream universe (three new ongoing JUSTICE LEAGUE series will spin off the events of NO JUSTICE). It seemed to start off great from a conceptual POV, with the introduction of a big cosmic menace to the whole universe, which can only be defeated by disassembling the all of the current DC hero teams, and dividing them up again into four new Justice League teams with key supervillains as part of the line-ups -- all overseen with the help of Brainiac, the only one smart enough to figure things out, and how to defeat the big cosmic threat.  And of course, there's immediate chaos among the heroes and conflict over the "but can we trust him?" factor. The first three issues of No Justice were all a build-up in tension, whereas the last one just seems like the threat was resolved far too easily -- a real deus ex machina ending. We are assured by the characters in the story, however, that the universe has been irrevocably changed and will never be the same after these events. It didn't feel too convincing to me. By where it left off at the end of issue #3, it seems like the plot/storyline hadn't even quite reached the half-point of development, and it felt like the series should have taken its time to play things out over at least 6 issues, if not 8 or 12. Events were set into motion by something (the breaking of the Source Wall) which occurred in the earlier event series METAL (which I didn't read past the first couple of issues because it was so convoluted). I blame Scott Snyder, who masterminded both METAL and this (although DC employed other writers to actually script from Snyder's plot). I didn't care for Snyder's take on Batman, and I don't care for the idea of DC making him the 'architect' of its universe.

DOOMSDAY CLOCK, on the other hand, is a sequel to WATCHMEN (1986), DC's most-reprinted graphic novel collection, and is written by Geoff Johns. For a number of years prior to the 2011 New 52 DC reboot, Johns had been the mastermind behind revitalizing a number of DC's character franchises that had gone fallow, including JSA/Justice Society of America, Hawkman, Teen Titans, Green Lantern (with GL: Rebirth), Flash (beginning with FLASH: Rebirth, that brought back the dead-since-CRISIS ON INFINITE EARTHS Barry Allen Flash), Superman (with SUPERMAN: SECRET ORIGIN and a run in ACTION COMICS), Booster Gold (in collaboration with BG's creator, Dan Jurgens), and the CRISIS sequel INFINTE CRISIS, as well as the line-wide GL-centric big event series DARKEST NIGHT and its sequel BRIGHTEST DAY. Despite also being the writer of the execrable (but best-selling) editorially-concocted FLASHPOINT, which destroyed the remnants of the old DCU and led into the New 52 reboot, Johns was then promoted to the position of DC's Chief Creative Officer, and given the flagship New 52 JUSTICE LEAGUE to insure a strong backbone series for the N52 relaunch -- but since giving it up the writing on JL last year, it's not surprising that last year's relaunch/refresh (but not a reBOOT, per se) of DC's main universe was rolled out under the REBIRTH banner for all their main universe titles. Johns wrote the introductory one-shot REBIRTH issue, which hinted at the arrival in the mainstream DCU of survivors from the WATCHMEN universe, and followed up last year with a four-part crossover in BATMAN and FLASH tying together plot threads from FLASHPOINT with both WATCHMEN and the general scheme of the current state of reality across the DC Multiverse. Which brings us to DOOMSDAY CLOCK, with a handful of Watchmen refugees (Ozymandias, Dr. Manhattan, Nite-Owl, Rorschach, and The Comedian, as well as a few minor characters) appearing to shake things up in the regular DCU. It feels carefully written, and evocative of the general tone and style of the original WATCHMEN, but somehow seems at odds with the general feel of DC's current line. Things here, as in WATCHMEN, are handled in more of a real-world way, with the rise of a populist backlash to superheroes in general, according to a belief in what is called "The Superman Theory", a conspiracy claim that the vast numbers of superheroes (in the U.S., particularly) is attributable to the fact that most superheroes are, in fact, products of a secret government plan to create a metahuman army, stimulating metagene-positive individuals by exposure to various traumatic conditions in order to activate their latent superpowers. All well and good, but it really doesn't seem to fit with the general ethos of the DCU. Why would the public suddenly become suspicious and hostile towards superheroes after years of them being around? The lesson to be learned from the orignal WATCHMEN is that too much grim and gritty reality undermines the basic fantasy element necessary for the suspension of disbelief that allows an entire fantastic genre of superheroes to exist in ongoing monthly adventures; if there is change in the DCU, it is mostly of the illusory sort -- i.e., the changes are temporary and reversible, according to the whims of editors, writers, and consumer reactions. In the Watchmen universe, designed to adhere more closely to the real world as its basic premise, consequences of actions and the impact on the status quo is permanent and irreversible. Dead is dead, if you saw the body buried. In the DCU, Superman, Batman, Robin, Green Lantern, Flash, Hawkman, and Wonder Woman have all died at least once (and in some cases, multiple times) but are still around, and none the worse for wear, still ready to do their jobs of selling more comic book stories every month, even if they sometimes got a temporary time-out to be replaced by someone else carrying the names and wearing the costumes. Since we know that, unlike the original Watchmen, the DCU characters must go on and on in monthly adventures, after the conclusion of this series, rather than being irrevocably altered by the impact of events in this self-contained storyline, one might wonder what exactly is the point of the plot, here? Well, to sell comic books, obviously -- but can there ever be any really satisfying conclusion to this story? One wonders, too, where are the original Charlton Comics characters (owned by DC Comics since 1985) on whom the Watchmen were based -- Captain Atom (Dr. Manhattan), The Blue Beetle (Nite-Owl), The Question (Rorschach), Peacemaker (The Comedian), and Thunderbolt (Ozymandias)? While they have kept a relatively low profile in the DCU since 1985 as second-string heroes, it would be fascinating to see them by comparison and contrast to their darker/more realist counterparts from Watchmen. Little things about the DCU just seem kind of "off" in DOOMSDAY CLOCK, like the former villainess Killer Frost (as recent as a couple of months ago, now a member of the Justice League of America) making an appearance, looking totally different (in fact, her appearance in DOOMSDAY CLOCK goes back to her original look created for FIRESTORM in the 1980s, while her current DCU appearance is quite a bit altered since then). Batman is wearing the yellow-circled bat-emblem on his costume that he hasn't worn in years now. Superman already has his red shorts back, even before Brian Michael Bendis arrived at DC to restore them in the new MAN OF STEEL miniseries. None of that will matter to the many readers who'll be reading this story in a later collected edition -- readers who've read Watchmen but are not regular followers of the current DC line. And perhaps the series was designed to be so, as opposed to seamlessly blending with the current stream of DC's mainstream universe reality.

Manga:
  SAINT SEIYA: SAINTIA SHO VOL 02 [tankobon Pb] - This is another manga which is a cosmic/mythological science-fantasy action saga (a spinoff of the popular 1980s/90s Shonen Jump series Saint Seiya, known in translation as KNIGHTS OF THE ZODIAC) in the general vein of Jack Kirby's THOR or THE NEW GODS, or Jim Starlin's various cosmic superhero sagas with Thanos. The goddess Athena has been reborn on earth after many centuries, and is beginning her process of 'awakening' in the body of a young Japanese woman, in anticipation of the coming Galaxian Wars. The evil Eris, goddess of discord, has also been similarly reborn into the body of an earthwoman and is awakening to her full power. Athena is dedicated to preserving justice, and devoted to protecting mankind from the machinations of the gods, and so a cadre of guardian-warriors have been recruited to wear special metallic 'cloth', a kind of body armor capable of reconfiguring itself independently of its user, and become Athena's "Saints", her personal bodyguards until she awakens fully to her powers, and afterwards her private army to defeat the evil being sown among humans on earth by Eris and her confederates. Saints must develop their innate 'cosmo' which is a kind of psychically-deployed means of transmuting matter and energy, in order to wear the sacred cloths based on various zodiacal signs, and best serve Athena in her battle to protect humanity from destruction.

10
I really think in pushing hard for television adaptations like Riverdale and Sabrina, Jon Goldwater's true goal is to raise Archie's cultural awareness just high enough to attract a big media conglomerate as a buyer for ACP.

I would imagine he's got something like a hundred-million figure in mind for the sale of all ACP's intellectual property, but I bet if he got a serious offer about a third of that size, he'd sign on the dotted line and bail out next month -- if Nancy Silberkleit is willing to take her cut and walk.


Nancy might just block it for spite depending on her financial condition.

This is all just my subjective impressions, but the general vibe I got from Nancy is that she wanted to keep Archie in the traditional mode, for the traditional audience (pre-teens and young kids, girls especially), whereas the impression I get from JG is that he doesn't give a fig about comics as a medium, the characters, OR the audience -- he just wants to make money. If the newsstand market is evaporating, he's probably correct in the assessment that ACP can only try to cater to the smaller (but fairly stable and dedicated) audience of comic shop consumers if he wants to continue in publishing. Not that he actually "wants" to continue as a publisher per se, just that he wants to build a small heap of material suitable to attract the attentions of media adaptations, which is hopefully raising the coin of ACP's intellectual property holdings to the extent that some corporation might see some potential in owning those characters as exploitable, marketable, pre-sold audience material. He's just looking to cash out and retire in ease. On the other hand, Nancy Silberkleit has demonstrated in the past that she does care about some things, at least -- kids with disabilities, literacy, and so forth, and wants to use the characters' familiarity to help those causes. That's my read on the situation, anyway.

Not that I'm implying that makes Jonboy G out to be something like the Antichrist of the comic book industry or anything. In my opinion, it just makes him... well, pretty much the same as any of the folks making the business management decisions at Marvel or DC, or... most comic book publishers, medium-sized or even small. Like any other line of work, there are people who are in the comic book business because they love the work and can't imagine doing anything else, and people... who are not. Hey, the way I look at it, most people think about a lot of the same things in their jobs. "I'd like to keep my job. I'd like to make my boss happy, and not have him breathing down my neck. I'd like to get a promotion and do less of the grunt work, have more responsibility. I'd like to make more money so I don't have to worry about current bills, or my future. I've worked long enough; I'd like to retire now comfortably and just relax for a while." Had I entered the biz via the same route JG did, I can't say with any assurance that I'd do things any differently than he is. My only real gripe with the guy is both an aesthetic and practical one -- that he's putting out fewer and fewer pages of new material of the kind of Archie Comics I enjoy reading. And I guess I can't even really be an objective judge of whether or not someone "loves comics" or doesn't, because they might just have polar opposite tastes in what's good than I do -- just like anyone involved in any aspect, not only of the comic book industry, but ANY media that employs characters originating in comics. I can absolutely love something like Cartoon Network's JUSTICE LEAGUE ACTION cartoon, while looking at the trailer for Warner Brothers' JUSTICE LEAGUE movie with a blank-faced "What the what?" and shrugging, "Doesn't have anything to do with me; sorry, no interest." I can love the idea of ARCHIE MEETS BATMAN '66, or the DC characters appearing in SCOOBY-DOO TEAM-UP, while not giving two beans about what's going on in the regular ongoing DC universe BATMAN or SUPERMAN comic books. Same with Archie comic books; same with RIVERDALE. There will always be something else to read (or watch), I guess, whether new or old.

11
I really think in pushing hard for television adaptations like Riverdale and Sabrina, Jon Goldwater's true goal is to raise Archie's cultural awareness just high enough to attract a big media conglomerate as a buyer for ACP.

I would imagine he's got something like a hundred-million figure in mind for the sale of all ACP's intellectual property, but I bet if he got a serious offer about a third of that size, he'd sign on the dotted line and bail out next month -- if Nancy Silberkleit is willing to take her cut and walk.

12
General Discussion / Re: What comics have you been reading?
« on: May 25, 2018, 03:50:50 AM »
05-17 to 05-24-18:
JIMMYS BASTARDS #8
THE FURTHER ADVENTURES OF NICK WILSON #5 (of 5)
G.I. JOE VS THE SIX MILLION DOLLAR MAN #4 (of 4)
HIT-GIRL #4

COSMO #5 (of 5) - Sorry to see it go. Along with YOUR PAL ARCHIE and MIGHTY CRUSADERS, it's one of a very few floppy comics ACP has published in the last year or two that I really enjoyed. There's still SUPERTEENS VS CRUSADERS upcoming, but that's a mere 2-issue microseries, and then ARCHIE MEETS BATMAN '66 (which I'm not sure how many issues there are supposed to be of... probably somewhere between 4 and 6). And then there's the upcoming DIE KITTY DIE: HEAVEN & HELL from AstroComix and (hopefully) more of SUPER SUCKERS from Darin Henry's SitComics.

SCOOBY-DOO TEAM-UP (with Blue Falcon & Dynomutt) #38 - It's officially my favorite DC comic book right now (with Future Quest Presents in 2nd place). Writer Sholly Fisch does a great job of working in Easter eggs and in-jokes for long-time DC fans, and handles the humor deftly with a light touch, and I'm loving the variety of DC and Hanna-Barbera guest-stars.

LOONEY TUNES #243 - It's good, but the writing tends to be variable from story to story.

JUSTICE LEAGUE: NO JUSTICE #3 (of 4) - DC heroes and villains reconfigured into new Justice League teams to battle 4 giant cosmic beings (somewhat like Marvel's Galactus in that they feed on the energies of entire planets)

FLASH #47 ("Flash War", Part 1) - Not sure if I'll stick with this, or if it's really going anywhere in particular with this story of Wally West's pre-Flashpoint/New 52 reboot memories.

DETECTIVE COMICS #981 - "Batmen Eternal" Conclusion. Looks like they're breaking up the Bat-family team that starred in this title since the first Rebirth issue (#934, which restored the legacy numbering) and changing the writer, so this might be my last issue. I enjoy the Batman-inspired protege characters, and liked seeing them interact as a regular team, and James Tynion IV was one of the few of the more recent crop of writers at DC whose work I liked. The new writer Bryan Hill, is an unknown to me, and the solicitations for #982 and beyond don't really interest me.

WONDER WOMAN #47 - I haven't been enjoying this as much the last couple of issues, but I guess I'll keep following it through issue #50, which appears to be the last written by James Robinson (an old favorite of mine). Looks like I'm dropping most of the few DC in-universe titles which I still read. (I'm not thrilled with the idea of Brian Michael Bendis taking over on Superman, either. He pretty much ruined Avengers and Guardians of the Galaxy for me, over at Marvel.)

THE TERRIFICS #4
- Still reading this (for a while, at least) because I enjoy Jeff Lemire's work, especially on Dark Horse's BLACK HAMMER and its various spinoff miniseries).

INFINITY COUNTDOWN: DARKHAWK #1 (of 4)
THE BEEF #4 (of 5)
BLACK HAMMER: AGE OF DOOM #2
PELLUCIDAR: AT THE EARTH'S CORE #1
(one-shot)
STAR TREK: NEW VISIONS #21: "THE ENEMY OF MY ENEMY"
THE SEASON OF THE SNAKE #1 & 2

Millenium Edition: Superman's Girl Friend LOIS LANE #1 (1958/2000 reprint)
Millenium Edition: Superman's Pal JIMMY OLSEN #1 (1954/2000 reprint)
Millenium Edition: Tales Calculated to Drive You MAD #1 (1952/2000 reprint)

WORLD'S FINEST COMICS #166 (May 1967) - This was the first and only appearance of Bron Wayn E7705, the 20th direct descendant of Bruce Wayne and the future Batman of 2967. In this story, "The Danger of the Deadly Duo" written by then-High School student Jim Shooter (later to become the editor-in-chief at Marvel Comics in the 1980s), he first teams up with the Superman of 2967 [Klar Ken T5477] to battle their two archenemies, the future Joker and Superman's arch-foe Muto (a yellow-skinned hyperencephalic mutant with advanced telekinetic powers). The story was a sequel to previous appearances of the Superman of the 30th Century in SUPERMAN #181 and ACTION COMICS #338-39 (all written by Edmond Hamilton, who also wrote many of the early Legion of Super-Heroes stories). Unlike some other occasional diversions from the normal Superman continuity of the time, this one was not labeled as an "Imaginary Story" that "may or may not ever happen someday", but this was the final story in this sequence of future Superman tales. I loved searching out and discovering these oddball "special" stories as a young comic book collector. All of them were reprinted in the 2008 trade paperback collection, SUPERMAN: PAST AND FUTURE.


13
I can't really see returning to classic style helping all that much. It wasn't selling which is why the reboots happened to begin with.


I think to most people, Archie Comics are an anachronism.  Not sure there's much they can do except continue the gimmicks like horror, the tv show, and crossovers (Batman '66) until they run out of ideas.

That's pretty much the size of it, Vegan. I can see something like, once RIVERDALE has run its course, it getting an animated spinoff that's more comedy oriented, and then there being a floppy comic book based on that, but I think that's about as close as we'll get, apart from the occasional crossover miniseries or one-shot. The crossovers are all aimed at an older, nostalgic audience of comic book collectors, as proven by the properties chosen: Kiss, Predator, The Ramones, and Batman '66 (even Harley & Ivy, arguably most familiar to the audience that watched Batman the Animated Series in the early 1990s). Still hoping to see one with Scooby-Doo.

The fact that ACP doesn't want to invest in more new pages of classic Archie stories to keep feeding the source material for ongoing digest reprints indicates that they don't see those digests having much longer of a future.

14
General Comics / Re: 'Dandy' Dan De in "BINGO to GO-GO!"
« on: May 17, 2018, 07:29:41 AM »
Curious. In the second comic, DeCarlo drew this for another comic book publisher in 1966? He was making his mark in ACP then, yet they let him do some freelancing?

Despite what some people may think, Dan DeCarlo was never a regular "employee" in the usual sense. He began with ACP in 1951, with the 4-page story "No Picnic" in Archie's Girls Betty and Veronica #4 -- which is the same year that the Bingo story posted above was published in Standard Comics' Kathy #8; meanwhile, DDC was also working for Stan Lee at Atlas/Marvel, and drawing The Yardbirds for Ziff-Davis' G.I. Joe.

The point to be made here is that Dan DeCarlo was never under any sort of contract with any publisher; not with Atlas/Marvel, and not with Archie Comic Publications, either. He started, and remained for the duration of his career, a freelance contractor, paid by the page.

Tippy Teen (and its spinoff title, Go-Go and Animal) were published by Tower Comics (perhaps more famously remembered by comic fans for publishing T.H.U.N.D.E.R. Agents, and its spinoff titles Dynamo, NoMan, and U.N.D.E.R.S.E.A. Agent). Tower Comics' owner was Harry Shorten. If that name sounds familiar, it's because Shorten was, from the early 1940s until the early 1960s, an editor for MLJ (and later Archie Comic Publications). In fact, Shorten had been the editor of PEP Comics #22, which introduced Archie. Shorten had a variety of side publishing projects, one of which was a syndicated comic panel (in collaboration with Super Duck artist Al Fagaly) entitled There Oughta Be A Law! (which, to put it bluntly, was a lesser imitation of the more well-known syndicated comic They'll Do It Every Time by Jimmy Hatlo).

In an effort to promote his own comic strip, Shorten (who had some direct connections with printers) on several occasions self-published collections of There Oughta Be A Law!. The last couple of these appeared under the Tower Books imprint, and at this point Shorten published some other paperbacks, so now he was officially a publisher. As a side note, Shorten was involved as a middleman in helping ACP gain the license to publish a Shadow comic book -- Archie's version went the superhero route, while at the same time, Tower Books' paperback line published writer Dennis Lynds' update of the 1930s Street & Smith pulp hero to the then-popular superspy genre, inspired by James Bond and The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

In 1965, noticing the rise in popularity of superhero comics, Shorten decided to start his own comic book publishing company, Tower Comics, and contracted with Wallace Wood to oversee those superhero titles as a "packager" of editoral/story/artwork. Not wanting to overlook the genre with which he had the most experience as an editor, he persuaded ACP's Samm Schwartz to oversee and package the stories and art for Tippy Teen. Because the format of all the Tower comic books was 25c for 68 pages of all-new material, the first issue of Tippy's comic also included contributions from Harry Lucey and Dan DeCarlo, in addition to the bulk of pages by Schwartz.

As a result of Schwartz' decision to go with Shorten's new company (one could hardly blame him, since he was probably offered a much better page rate by Shorten for packaging the entire contents of the Tower teen humor titles), ACP cut off all Schwartz' freelance assignments. It's not known if Schwartz simply declared that he was leaving ACP, or whether (it's been rumored) he was caught working on Shorten's material in the ACP offices, or whether he was given some sort of ultimatum -- but regardless of the fact that ACP regulars Lucey and DeCarlo also contributed (and perhaps they were threatened by ACP in some way, which would account for the relatively few pages they contributed to Tippy and Go-Go), Samm Schwartz was the only ACP regular to suffer a total loss of freelance assignments at ACP. After Tower Comics folded, Schwartz migrated to DC Comics to work on A Date With Debbi and Debbi's Dates, and didn't return to ACP until the early 1970s, after DC had cancelled those titles, along with Swing With Scooter, Leave It to Binky and Binky's Buddies -- abandoning the teen humor genre entirely.

15
News and New Releases / Re: ARCHIE COMICS FOR MARCH 2017
« on: May 10, 2018, 04:20:04 PM »
Ahh... Charlotte's Web.  A web-spider named "Charlotte". Isn't that cute?  :knuppel2:

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