collapse

* Random Image

dec151007
dec151007
Posted by: BettyReggie
Posted in album: BettyReggie favorites

* Search


* Recent Topics

What have you done today? by Archiecomicxfan215
[Today at 10:26:06 AM]


What is to become of me and my collection? by JanaRonnie
[Today at 05:16:32 AM]


Archie and Jughead in Winter Christmas Double Date by JanaRonnie
[Today at 05:16:24 AM]


Archie & Me: Prank Attack by PTF
[June 17, 2018, 01:42:19 PM]


Super Suckers: That Lady is a Real Witch by PTF
[June 17, 2018, 12:52:44 PM]


Betty and Veronica Vixens coming to an end with issue 10 by DeCarlo Rules
[June 16, 2018, 02:26:26 PM]


Library Books That You All Read by BettyReggie
[June 16, 2018, 02:13:45 PM]


ARCHIE COMICS FOR NOVEMBER 2017 by JamesScefe
[June 16, 2018, 10:11:52 AM]


What comics have you been reading? by BettyReggie
[June 15, 2018, 08:49:58 AM]


Riverdale Reviewed by Tuxedo Mark
[June 14, 2018, 08:12:06 PM]

* Shoutbox

Refresh History
  • Tuxedo Mark: And another one: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:42:07 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: Riverdale spoof: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:35:22 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: My review of "Roughing It!" from B&V Friends #262: [link]
    June 14, 2018, 08:12:53 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: @irishmoxie -- It's definitely complete. All six of the 1958-59 Sy Reit/Bob White original issues, plus the feature-length "Good Guys of the Galaxy" by Tom DeFalco & Fernando Ruiz from ARCHIE #655, and three 5-page digest shorts that guest-starred Cosmo -- and the complete first issue of the Ian Flynn/Tracy Yarley COSMO (2017) thrown in for good measure. It follows the same layout/format as the previous JUGHEAD'S TIME POLICE, even though that didn't carry the "Archie Comics Presents..." trade dress. Not a bad buy for $11.
    June 14, 2018, 01:08:59 AM
  • irishmoxie: Anyone get the Cosmo book that came out today? Any good?
    June 13, 2018, 08:04:49 PM
  • Cosmo: Ah man....and I was worried I was the last enthusiast for ERB's stuff. I'm currently rereading my Dell Tarzan books. Really good fun! It took a while to complete that run.
    June 12, 2018, 06:51:53 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: ...Marvel's earlier JOHN CARTER, WARLORD OF MARS in there, so the DE Tarzan comics need to go in a different box, and SHEENA (also a recent DE title) and DC's RIMA THE JUNGLE GIRL will help fill up that box.
    June 11, 2018, 07:40:48 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Recently. DE's unauthorized LORD OF THE JUNGLE Tarzan adaptations (and its authorized THE GREATEST ADVENTURE) won't fit into my existing box of previous Tarzan comics from Gold Key, DC, and Dark Horse, so I have to start a new box. Logically these get filed with DE's unauthorized WARLORD OF MARS comics (including DEJAH THORIS) and their authorized JOHN CARTER, WARLORD OF MARS. But I also want to squeeze Marve;
    June 11, 2018, 07:38:48 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Interesting. I tend not to group titles by publisher at all, if the characters were not created as work-for-hire (meaning the publisher is legally considered the 'author' of the character). Do they belong to that publisher's "universe" (assuming it has one)? There are some publishers like Dynamite Entertainment where the vast majority of the titles they publish are licensed, and thus were "inherited" from other publishers. Therefore it makes more sense to me to group them together in boxes with similar characters. Flash Gordon, The Phantom, and Mandrake comics (regardless of who the actual publisher was) go together in the same box because they're all classic adventure heroes licensed from Hearst Entertainment (formerly King Features Syndicate). Pulp fiction heroes like The Shadow, Doc Savage, and The Spider (regardless of the fact that the latter did not originate with the same publisher as the first two) also get grouped together. Space considerations allowing, Tarzan (and other Edgar Rice Burroughs adaptations) might share the same box with Sheena and Rima, but NOT with Ka-Zar, because he's a Marvel Universe character.
    June 11, 2018, 07:16:22 PM
  • rusty: I do keep all Star Trek series together in their own section and all Star Wars books together.  I also keep all 2000AD titles together and manga books get their own section.  For titles that have switched publishers, I usually keep them all with the publisher that I identify them with the most.  Tarzan has been published by a variety of publishers, but I keep them with Dell/Gold Key.  Conan is starting to get a bit close with all the success Dark Horse has had, but I still identify Conan more with Marvel.
    June 11, 2018, 06:27:26 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Believe it or not, I even have a box labeled "Pseudo-manga" that contains comics published by American companies and created by American creators like Astro Boy & Racer X (Now Comics), Battle of the Planets (Gold Key & Top Cow/Image), Captain Harlock (Malibu), Godzilla (Dark Horse) and Ultraman. I just want to keep those separate from the boxes of real translated manga in floppy comic format.
    June 11, 2018, 03:34:17 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Well. the problem is when you get titles with licensed characters that aren't owned by the publisher. So if you collect Star Trek comics, you'd have different series published by Gold Key, Marvel, DC, and IDW (and I probably missed one in there). It doesn't make sense to me to put them in different boxes by publisher, but to each his own. Disney comics would be another example. There are even some instances where if I like a certain artist enough, I will put all his work regardless of publisher or characters into one box, like Paul Gulacy, Steve Rude, or Mike Allred (and file them chronologically from older to newer, rather than alphabetically). Those are examples where my interest in the creator far exceeds my relative interest in whatever characters are involved.
    June 11, 2018, 03:14:29 PM
  • rusty: That makes sense.  There are many ways that people can file books.  What I do is file by company or category and then alphabetically within each section.  My first category is Richie Rich then Archie, then other Harvey titles, then Disney, then other humor/kids books, then by company (unless it is a company where I don't have very many books from them.  Star Trek and Star Wars each get their own section as well.  I will probably revamp a bit when I do my next major sort/merge.  The biggest section by far for me is DC.
    June 11, 2018, 09:28:59 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: I don't even file my comics alphabetically. I file them according to how closely they're related to other titles, but it's all dependent on the number of issues I have of any given title, and what will fit into a single box. Fpr ACP comics I just put all the short-run series (whether an actual miniseries or just a not particularly successful title) into one box. Even though some of those short run series star Jughead, and I could as easily file those together with the main JUGHEAD title in another box. For longer running ACP titles, "girl" titles are sorted into different boxes than "boy" titles. Eventually when I have enough issues of BETTY (and BETTY AND ME and BETTY'S DIARY) they'll get their own box, and VERONICA will get her own box.
    June 10, 2018, 09:49:06 AM
  • rusty: I file Jughead under J and Reggie under R in all of their incarnations, though I do file the original Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen books under S since that keeps them with the Superman books and also because they kept that title throughout their entire run.  If anyone wants to look up Jughead or Reggie in Overstreet, though, they will have to look under A for the early issues.
    June 10, 2018, 07:56:27 AM
  • BettyReggie: I can't wait to get that Reggie book. It's coming out the day after my 39th Birthday.
    June 10, 2018, 06:42:06 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Yeah, I never understood why publishers felt the need to point that out on the covers of a comic book, like maybe someone didn't really know who REGGIE was, and might buy it just because they noticed the words "Archie's Rival" above the big letters that spelled REGGIE? Same with "Archie's Pal" or "Superman's Pal" or "Superman's Girl Friend" -- like some potential buyer wouldn't know who Jughead, Jimmy Olsen, or Lois Lane was, but would know who Archie or Superman was? Just assume you're selling the product to idiots, I guess. Is anyone really filing REGGIE under "A" for Archie's Pal in their collections??
    June 10, 2018, 05:42:02 AM
  • rusty: In it's first incarnation, Reggie was titled ARCHIE'S RIVAL, REGGIE.  It wasn't until after the title was resurrected nearly a decade later that it became REGGIE and then REGGIE AND ME.
    June 09, 2018, 10:23:13 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: I've never understood why those old titles had "and Me" in them, anyway. Why not just name the titles after the starring characters?
    June 09, 2018, 08:17:45 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Funny that the trade paperback collection is entitled REGGIE AND ME Vol. 1, when his floppy comic book series was actually titled just plain REGGIE for the first 18 issues (and going on hiatus for nine years in between issues #14 and 15). Since it's only a 224-page book, that should mean we'll be seeing reprints of stories from the first 9 (or maybe 10) issues. So shouldn't it be titled REGGIE Vol. 1? Unless they actually do plan to start the first volume with issue #19 from 1966 (the first classic Evilheart issue) where the title actually changed to REGGIE AND ME. My theory is that the ME in that title = Evilheart, unlike the prior titles ARCHIE AND ME (where ME = Mr. Weatherbee), or BETTY AND ME (where the ME = Archie).
    June 09, 2018, 12:59:59 PM

Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - Cosmo

Pages: [1]
1
The wise man is content in his own wisdom, and has no need or desire to prove anything to others or insist on the superiority of his own philosophy over theirs. The only thing he would prove is the hubris that attends his own flawed humanity.

2
Oh, not this again. Yes, no one understands the Meaning of Life. But somehow that doesn't stop people from preaching at others that their own understanding of the Meaning of Life is still better than mine. If you really want to do the world a big favor, make a funny movie about it like Monty Python did. At least they had a positive measurable impact by generating some laughs for people.

3
General Discussion / Re: What have you done today?
« on: April 24, 2018, 05:52:37 PM »
I just got a huge package from Archie Comics which I'm saving for Christmas. I'm starting my 2018 Christmas bag in which I save whatever package that I get .

4
General Discussion / Re: How many comics do you own?
« on: February 16, 2018, 04:08:02 AM »
I've been pondering the idea of collectors and collecting for a few years now, and what it is that motivates me and other collectors. There seem to be a few different psychological components to the collector mindset, which may differ somewhat among individuals. There's a definite obsessive-compulsive aspect that compels a person to focus their thoughts and energies into collecting, but it seems to start with a emotional component, an attachment to things which is sentimental and/or nostalgic. A person's unique sense of aesthetics and personal identity are a big part of it as well, and the desire to surround ourselves with objects which are representative of our inner selves -- we are what we like or enjoy.

From the publishers' perspective, there's been a growing awareness of the usefulness of using marketing to create or stimulate consumerism to collectors ever since the mid-1960s, and since the late 1980s, that type of consumer, the collector, has become the most important core audience. You see it reflected all the time in things like cover blurbs proclaiming "First Issue Collector's Item!". That's true as well of "chase collectibles" like variant covers (if it's harder to find, it might be worth having). Even the fact that comic books are numbered in a series -- it wasn't always so, and 1940s comics sometimes bear no issue numbers on the cover, but only a volume and issue in the fine print of the indicia on the interior of the book. Like they used to say on the back of trading cards, "One in a series - collect them all!" There's a certain disposition on the part of publishers to invoke a learned Pavlovian response, creating a likelihood of impulse purchasing, and establishing a habit pattern. Mostly what they refer to that as, in general terms, is "branding" -- in the hopes that familiarity will create the hoped-for urge stimulating purchases, that a positive name-association invokes predisposition to purchasing. "Continuity" is another factor which has been used and well-worked to stimulate consumerism, among publishers... the idea that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, and that you (the consumer) wouldn't want to miss something vitally important in the scheme of a larger "saga" or story universe. That is often seen in cross-title story events which have a title banner indicating that the comic book is part of a larger arc (which you NEED to have). These started out as the "blockbuster movie" analogs of the comic book world, in order to stimulate sales in a slow season, but now they appear with regularity from the larger publishers on a several-times-a-year basis.

Of course different collectors are oriented differently. My own predilection is toward a strong focus on the graphic storytelling medium, and to a specific aesthetic appreciation of the work of particular writers and/or artists (as opposed to focusing on characters to the exclusion of everything else). This probably explains why I don't get too excited about movies or television shows based on comic book characters. I tend not to connect with those, because when I look at it what I see is "the hand" behind it -- a bunch of actors in costumes. Comics seem purer as a medium because they are the product of fewer hands, and thus less dilute when considering a creator's vision. I like Batman, but am less inclined to be a consumer of "all things Batman" (or of "all things Archie"), and more likely to focus on collecting "Dan Parent" or "Dan De Carlo". The more the work seems to express the personal idiosyncrasies of the creator in question, the better -- those are the creators who stand out as strong individuals because of their styles and preferred themes or characters.

5
All About Archie / Archie Comics was mentioned on Jeopardy tonight 1/5/18
« on: January 05, 2018, 07:41:00 PM »
I recorded it! :smitten:
The guy who won, priceless reaction



https://youtu.be/L7N_YvTy2g0

6
General Discussion / Re: What have you done today?
« on: November 09, 2017, 10:24:51 AM »
I did not get the job. People are thinking she probably wanted to hire her friends as she was a young interviewer/manager, only 23 years old (i knew her age because she told me she started at age 16 and 7 years later she now is a manager)


My job called me at 7:50am i saw the voicemail asking me to work a morning shift. I didn't hear my phone didnt get the message until 10:03am ughh too late to go in, of course they call me when my sound is off and my phone is updating :/

7
All About Archie / Re: Bart Beaty's TWELVE-CENT ARCHIE
« on: September 11, 2017, 03:35:19 AM »
My own analysis of the history of Archie Comics indicates that attempting to slice the company's history into decades doesn't present the best approach to understanding the evolution of change in its publishing history. All the natural landmarks along the road point to an approach by which a better understanding of the company can be had by looking at it in chunks beginning in the middle of one decade, and ending in the middle of the following one.

1939-1945: Pre-war and WWII - In this period, the company was not yet defined by Archie as the dominant character and force behind its publishing. Archie appears first as an anthology feature in the otherwise superhero-dominated titles Pep and Jackpot and receives his own title in 1943, but the majority of the company's output is still dominated by adventure features. Also in 1943, the company branches out with media adaptations of two of its most popular characters, with the radio series The Adventures of Archie Andrews, and The Black Hood. The former is a success and will continue running on one network or another for a decade, while the latter is a failure and lasts a single season. A pulp fiction magazine based on the Black Hood is also published to coincide with the radio series, but it too is a failure, lasting for only three issues. The success of Archie in his own self-titled comic book and as a radio series will decide the future direction of the company, with the shift from superheroes to comedy features in the anthology titles beginning almost as soon as the Black Hood's failure in other media becomes apparent, and will be largely complete by the end of the war. In actuality, the shift had begun even earlier, with the conversion of Top-Notch Comics (in which The Black Hood was the lead feature) to Top-Notch Laugh Comics (which continued to retain The Black Hood, but as a subordinate feature to other comedy features), beginning with issue #28, dated July 1942. Top-Notch Laugh Comics will end with issue #45 in May of 1945. Black Hood (the company's most successful superhero, along with The Shield) will outlive Top-Notch Laugh Comics in his own title, but only until issue #19 (June 1946).

1946-1955: Postwar Period - Superheroes are out of favor following the end of WWII, and comedy features (with ARCHIE as the flagship title) dominate the publisher's philosophy. "MLJ Magazines" is accordingly rechristened as "Archie Comic Publications" at the beginning of this period, and the Archie newspaper strip, launched early in 1946 under the sole creative control of Bob Montana, is the standard to which the comic book writers and artists look for their cues. In a very short time, the strip will be carried in hundreds of papers, exposing the character to audiences of millions not otherwise familiar with Archie in the comic books. This 10-year span also coincides with a boom period for the entire industry, with total industry sales peaking in the last couple of years prior to the institution of the Comics Code Authority seal on all comics distributed in 1955, indicating a sea-change for the entire industry. New titles spinning off from Archie begin proliferating at the end of the 1940s: Archie's Pal Jughead, Archie's Rival Reggie, Archie's Girls Betty and Veronica, and Archie's Pals 'n' Gals. Apart from the model established by Montana in the newspaper strip, no particular writers or artists on the Archie-related titles dominate the style or direction of the characters. By the end of this period, the erosion of sales will be heavily felt due to the rise of television as the dominant form of entertainment.

1956-1965: The Boomer Decade - Harry Lucey emerges as the major definer of Archie and his friends in the comic books, largely superseding Montana's conception as presented in the newspaper strip. Samm Schwartz does likewise in becoming the major artist defining Jughead as the star of his own series. At the beginning of the decade, Dan DeCarlo joins the company, at first moonlighting from his major employment at Atlas/Marvel, but by late in 1958 becoming a full-time freelancer at ACP. After that time, his importance in defining Betty and Veronica in their own title and as separate characters from Archie, gradually gains dominance over the Lucey conception of B&V at the beginning of this period. The importance of DeCarlo increases with the launch of Josie in 1963. Little Archie is conceived, written and drawn by Bob Bolling from 1956-1965, but is turned over to Dexter Taylor in 1965 in order to remake the low-selling title into something more closely resembling the main Archie title. Additional titles like Archie Giant Series, Archie's Madhouse, Archie's Joke Book, Jughead's Jokes, Life With Archie, and Archie and Me are launched and thrive. An attempted revival of Reggie in his own title is not successful, nor are other short-lived titles like Jughead's Fantasy. Samm Schwartz leaves Jughead and the company in 1965 to work for Harry Shorten at Tower Comics.

1966-1975: Everything's Archie - Beginning slightly earlier in 1965, there is a great deal of experimentation in response to the impact of cultural awareness of "camp" and "pop art", particularly resulting in the remaking of Archie, Jughead, Betty, and Reggie into superheroes as Pureheart, Captain Hero, Superteen, and Evilheart. The success of Silver Age superheroes at DC, and especially at Marvel, had resulted in revamping The Adventures of the Fly (running since 1959) as Fly-Man, and the revival of several of the company's Golden Age superheroes, resulting in the spinoff title The Mighty Crusaders. "Camp" abounded in these titles and on Archie's covers for most of 1966. The rise in popularity of DC and Marvel superhero comics in the early 1960s will affect not only competing comic book publishers, but also the content of Saturday morning animated programming in the 1966-1967 seasons. History will repeat itself, in a way, just as the crime and horror comics of the early 1950s inspired a parental backlash, a small vocal minority of concerned mothers will begin a movement against action/adventure-dominated children's fare on television, resulting in Filmation animation producer Lou Scheimer turning to Archie Comics in his search for a source of program content of a more innocuous and inoffensive nature. Archie Comics benefited from an unexpected windfall as the brief sales boom in superhero comics subsided in 1968, and ACP's new direction would take its cues from the successful Saturday morning animated shows The Archie Show, followed by Sabrina the Teenage Witch and then Josie and the Pussycats. Dan DeCarlo is given the responsibility of cover artist for the entire Archie lineup at the end of the decade, signaling the domination of his style as "the" Archie style. New titles will again proliferate beginning in the late 1960s: Archie's TV Laugh-Out, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, That Wilkin Boy, and the conversion of Archie's Madhouse into The Madhouse Glads, and Josie into Josie and the Pussycats. The animated shows bring an influx of new readers to Archie Comics, and titles like Everything's Archie are added to capitalize on the pop chart success of The Archies. As the superhero craze on television dies down by 1968, sales on superhero comics dwindle after a brief boomlet, and Archie Comics experiences a new sales boom of its own in teen humor titles during this period, with Archie outselling even Superman and The Amazing Spider-Man, and character merchandising at an all-time high. Archie's success as a publisher will even inspire the creation of teen humor titles at rival publishers DC and Marvel, along with other publishers. The animated adaptations continue to morph into different variations from season to season, but remain ubiquitous on television in various combinations of new episodes and reruns, from 1968-1975. It is during this period, as the main protagonist of Betty and Me for ten years, that Betty Cooper gradually gains acknowledgment from Archie that he sees her as more than a friend and "back-up date" and that he actually harbors romantic feelings for her. While she still remains the underdog in her rivalry with Veronica, the "Triangle" has been truly established by the close of the period. Late in this period, the company will briefly experiment with horror comics (Madhouse, Chilling Tales of Sorcery) under the Red Circle imprint, after the Comics Code is revised in 1972 (they are not successful). In 1975, Bob Montana dies, and ACP turns responsibility for the important newspaper strip over to Dan DeCarlo.

1976-1986: Changing Times - Newsstand sales begin to shrink in this period, but the worst is yet to come in the next period. As the latter half of the 1970s draws to a close, the animated adaptations are producing far fewer new episodes and reruns move from the major networks to syndication on local UHF stations. The boom of the previous period has ended, and the early 1980s sees the cancellations of many long-running titles that began in the previous period: Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Josie and the Pussycats, That Wilkin Boy, Reggie and Me. By the end of the period that will include all of the legacy titles: Pep, Laugh, Madhouse, Archie's TV Laugh-Out, Betty and Me. The first series of Betty and Veronica and Jughead will come to an end, to be replaced by new #1 issues beginning in 1987 (Betty and Me will be replaced by Betty #1), with only Archie carrying on the legacy numbering. Digest comics will become the major success for ACP by the end of this period, and by the next period they will dominate over sales of standard-format comic books, with the number of digest titles proliferating. At the end of the previous period, newsstand sales were still the dominant method of distribution for comic books, but by the end of this period, the balance will have shifted to specialized comic book stores catering mainly to hardcore comic book fans. The resultant loss of mass distribution in regular retail establishments across the country will profoundly affect ACP, as comic book shops cater to a much smaller audience of older consumer-collectors whose main interest is in the superhero genre.

8
All About Archie / Re: Deja Vu
« on: June 05, 2017, 03:10:33 AM »
If you ever checked out the WILBUR reprint section in ARCHIE DOUBLE DIGEST in the past, or in the last couple of issues of WORLD OF ARCHIE DOUBLE DIGEST, then you'll probably remember this image, which the digests use as a "title page" for the Wilbur stories section.

It's taken from the cover of WILBUR #89 (Oct. 1964) -  art by Samm Schwartz:


And here we have the cover of WILBUR #79 (July 1958) - cover art by Harry Lucey:

9
Dark Circle / Re: How red circle will truly be revived
« on: May 25, 2017, 04:49:27 PM »
Actually, DC never owned the ACP superheroes. They just licensed them from ACP, like they've licensed other characters over the years for comic books.

The 1940s incarnations of those superheroes are known as the MLJ superheroes (which all more or less ended by the time the company changed its name to Archie Comic Publications in 1946).

In 1959, Joe Simon & Jack Kirby created a couple of new superheroes titles for ACP, The Adventures of THE FLY and the Double Life of Private Strong. The latter title featured a hero named Lancelot Strong, who became an entirely new version of The Shield (completely unrelated to the earlier, 1940s version in anything but name). In 1964 ACP added a comic book adaptation of THE SHADOW, which by the third issue changed into a superhero version of that character who had super mental powers (kind of like Professor X crossed with Batman). During the early 1960s these titles all bore a corner cover box which declared them as part of the Archie Adventure Series. Around the same time The Adventures of THE JAGUAR was also added to the line. The new Shield's comic only ran 2 issues. The Shadow's comic ran 8 issues. The Jaguar's comic ran 15 issues, and The Fly's comic, having debuted several years earlier, ran 30 issues to 1964. The indicia to all these comics stated that they were published by Radio Comics, as opposed to Archie Comic Publications.

About 6 months passed without any superheroes, and then in 1965, all of a sudden The Fly was back... but now he had changed his name to FLY-MAN (with issue #31, which continued the numbering of the previous Fly series). With issue #35, and new cover corner box on FLY-MAN identified the comic as part of the Mighty Comics Group. In the issues in between, the Black Hood, the Shield, and the Comet had teamed up with Fly-Man and Fly-Girl,  to form THE MIGHTY CRUSADERS, which then spun off into its own comic book. FLY-MAN ran from #31 to #39 (with backup stories added featuring more revived MLJ heroes like the Hangman, the Web, and Steel Sterling), before changing into an anthology title called MIGHTY COMICS PRESENTS, which ran from #40 through #50 (one issue longer than Fly-Man's run). The MIGHTY CRUSADERS comic only ran 7 issues, and there was a one-shot giant-sized reprint comic called SUPER-HEROES VS. SUPER-VILLAINS. Together those 28 comics represent the entire output of The Mighty Comics Group.

The Red Circle name was originally used by in the 1970s for a short-lived series of horror comics, then lay dormant again for years until the 1980s. when the ACP superheroes were once again revived. THE MIGHTY CRUSADERS' 1980s series only ran from 1983-1985 for a total of 13 issues, but a number of the individual characters also got their own short-lived titles during this same time.

The came DC's attempt, Impact Comics, in the early 1990s, which only lasted a few years too. The second DC revival in the early 2000s was the first to revive the Red Circle imprint again. Then it lay dormant again for another decade before ACP itself finally attempted another try at superheroes with THE NEW CRUSADERS.

And ALL of those attempts were fairly straight mainstream superhero comics, until the relatively recent change in branding to Dark Circle.

So I guess the question I'd have to ask is if none of those attempts really managed to capture an audience and result in any significantly long-running titles, then what would make you think anything has changed in the times since then? Marvel and DC really do have total market domination when it comes to the genre of superheroes, so if even DC couldn't make it work for them...

10
Announcements / New: enhanced site security
« on: May 15, 2017, 12:33:05 AM »
Just a quick note for everyone. With the latest update to the forum software, I have switched the site over to use https (secure) URLs instead of plain http. You shouldn't notice much difference (though you'll now see a green lock and "Secure" next to the URL in Google Chrome and similar things in other browsers), but this will enhance security, especially where usernames and passwords are concerned. If you have any questions or run into any problems, let me know.

11
All About Archie / Re: Deja Vu
« on: April 29, 2017, 07:31:36 PM »
Partial cover redrawn.

Archie's Pals & Gals #29




Archie's Comic's Digest #38




Images from MCS

12
General Discussion / Re: What have you done today?
« on: April 12, 2017, 11:10:27 PM »
I still don't understand how Archie Comics, something so inoffensive and banal (at least the classic ones), can inspire such vitriol in people. It boggles my mind.


I think people like Alexandra/Ronnie come on the forums to feel good about themselves because they think they can one up these innocent Archie Comics fans. They believe most Archie fans are stupid because the comics are so simplistic. 


There is enough negativity in this world. I come here to relax and have fun. Why not talk about other hobbies/interests you enjoy if there's nothing going on in the Archie-verse? There are enough places on the internet i.e. Reddit, the YouTube comments section were these negative types can go play word games with each other.

13
General Discussion / Re: What have you done today?
« on: April 11, 2017, 07:30:08 AM »

Oldiesmann: I'm also very disappointed at these events but the wrong people were punished. It's obvious that De Carlo Rules and his sockpuppet Cosmo were the cause of this. I have great respect for Dan Decarlo, the artist but not his rules. It's obvious he runs this board, not you. Yes, there is an asshole on this board and it's the 3 of you.


For the record, I'm NOT Alexandra Cabot, Mr. Lodge, Rusty, Cosmo or anybody else. Check your IP addresses.


"Archie Comics are COMICAL comics". Take your own goddamn advise. Grow up. Get a clue. Deactivate my account.


Don't know how long you've been around here but "Alexandra Cabot"/"B-ko" has been on here starting arguments forever.  Sorry but your take is just wrong.  I've quit the board several times because of her (his?) nonsense.  I would love it if it's over forever, but given the history I'm guessing it will be back sooner than later.   

14
General Discussion / Re: What have you done today?
« on: April 10, 2017, 05:00:39 PM »
Performed a public service by alerting the System Administrator to a serious breach of netiquette.  :)

The vulgar thread in question was deleted as in poor taste, and offending parties were dealt with as Oldiesmann deemed appropriate.

A just and equitable resolution to a shameful episode of misbehavior.

Let's go back to having fun now.

15
Alexandra, calling people witless may be funny to you but all you seem to do is stir up crap.  Is it really THAT fun for you?  If so, I guess carry on, but I'll never understand why bashing people on an Archie Comics Forum is so entertaining to you.  It's bizarre.  I think you're the only one who finds it funny.  I can see why you might get some perverse satisfaction from it for five minutes but to keep doing it over and over makes me question your sanity. 

Pages: [1]

The Archie character names and likenesses are covered by the registered trademarks/copyrights of Archie Comic Publications, Inc. and are used with permission by this site. The Official Archie Comics website can be visited at www.archiecomics.com.
Live Support