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Days we look foward to as Archie Fans. by BettyReggie
[September 24, 2017, 08:57:48 AM]


Riverdale Reviewed by Tuxedo Mark
[September 23, 2017, 10:20:45 PM]


What are you currently watching? by irishmoxie
[September 23, 2017, 08:01:20 PM]


What comics have you been reading? by SAGG
[September 22, 2017, 07:22:18 PM]


hOW i WISH-- by DeCarlo Rules
[September 22, 2017, 11:38:44 AM]


Archie Barber Shop by DeCarlo Rules
[September 22, 2017, 05:51:52 AM]


What have you done today? by Archiecomicxfan215
[September 21, 2017, 09:49:39 AM]


Library Books That You All Read by BettyReggie
[September 20, 2017, 04:46:50 PM]


Whew! by SAGG
[September 20, 2017, 02:20:10 PM]


Rick and Morty by SAGG
[September 16, 2017, 09:05:26 PM]

* Shoutbox

Refresh History
  • Vegan Jughead: Wow, Mark, that was detailed!  Ha ha
    September 24, 2017, 06:32:42 AM
  • Tuxedo Mark: Here's my review of episode 2 of "Riverdale": [link]
    September 23, 2017, 10:21:29 PM
  • Brandytasir: Hello all....
    September 23, 2017, 07:35:23 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: 25 years...
    September 23, 2017, 02:57:35 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Oh, the irony~! The proposed superhero revival that was too dark and edgy for ACP in 1989 (Spectrum Comics) had to wait 25 to get published (as Dark Circle)... and by then it was "Been there, done that. Nobody cares." I only hope their take-away from lack of response to all the dark superheroes is to make the new Mighty Crusaders title into a fun action-adventure comic book.
    September 23, 2017, 02:56:55 PM
  • steveinthecity: * Article from July 1989.
    September 23, 2017, 12:27:26 PM
  • steveinthecity: An interesting Washington Post article about Archie & staying true to the CCA in what ACP publishes.[link]
    September 23, 2017, 12:26:28 PM
  • Vegan Jughead: Yes Mark.  192 pages.  Jumbos are 256, which was reduced from 288, which was reduced from 320.  The price continues to rise of course.  If you subscribe all issues are the same price.  I know you've had issues with subscriptions, though.
    September 22, 2017, 08:03:39 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: Are Annuals bigger than regular digests?
    September 22, 2017, 06:50:16 PM
  • DeCarlo Rules: On the plus side, of those 5 issues of B&V Friends in 2017, 2 of them are Jumbo issues and the other three are Annuals.
    September 22, 2017, 05:46:48 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Definitely. I was a little worried when there was no B&V Friends solicitation for November... that means only 5 issues came out this year, instead of 6 -- but since you got a renewal notice, and there's an issue solicited for December, it looks like it will continue!  :)
    September 22, 2017, 05:44:32 AM
  • Ronny G: I just got another email from archie.com wanting me to renew my B&V Friends subscription, so maybe that's a good sign?
    September 22, 2017, 04:43:39 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: Sorry about the typo in that link!  :-[
    September 22, 2017, 02:03:03 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: There's at least one more issue of B&V FRIENDS (#257) solicited for December this year. If it's not the last issue, then apparently it will continue. Here are the December 2017 Archie Comics solicits: [link]
    September 22, 2017, 02:02:34 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: There's at least one more issue of B&V FRIENDS (#257) solicited for December this year. If it's not the last issue, then apparently it will continue. Here are the December 2017 Archie Comics solicits: [url]https://www.previewsworld.com/Catalog?pub=ARCHIE%20COMIC%20PUBLICATIONS[/utl]
    September 22, 2017, 02:02:10 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: There's at least one more issue of B&V FRIENDS (#257) solicited for December this year. If it's not the last issue, then apparently it will continue. Here are the December 2017 Archie Comics solicits: [url]https://www.previewsworld.com/Catalog?pub=ARCHIE%20COMIC%20PUBLICATIONS[/utl]
    September 22, 2017, 01:59:53 AM
  • DeCarlo Rules: I just got email confirmation from the ACP subscription department... not only is JUGHEAD AND ARCHIE digest ending, but ARCHIE'S FUNHOUSE digest is ending as well. Both subscriptions are automatically switched to the new ARCHIE AND ME digest, unless a subscriber requests a different digest title. No word on B&V FRIENDS digest so far; here's hoping "no news is good news" in this case.
    September 21, 2017, 11:54:07 PM
  • Tuxedo Mark: KJ Apa was in a car accident. He's okay. But he fell asleep at the wheel after working a 16-hour day! Cole Sprouse hitched a ride in a production van or something. They should really pay for transportation for the actors after working long hours. [link]
    September 21, 2017, 04:20:59 PM
  • Archiecomicxfan215: My boyfriend is i can probably get some photos from him to post here
    September 21, 2017, 09:48:15 AM
  • BettyReggie: Anybody going to NYCC?
    September 21, 2017, 07:51:27 AM

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Messages - steveinthecity

Pages: [1] 2 3 4
1
Through the Decades / hOW i WISH--
« on: September 22, 2017, 07:31:47 AM »
that IDW & Archie would come out with more Golden Age collection of their newspaper strips.
3 ain't enough.

2
General Discussion / Re: Latest Hauls, what did you buy?
« on: September 16, 2017, 01:09:28 PM »
Ordered a huge pile of back issue Archie Comics from Mycomicshop.com. I'd have to wait forever until I just found those issues cheap somewhere.

3
All About Archie / Re: Bart Beaty's TWELVE-CENT ARCHIE
« on: September 11, 2017, 03:35:19 AM »
My own analysis of the history of Archie Comics indicates that attempting to slice the company's history into decades doesn't present the best approach to understanding the evolution of change in its publishing history. All the natural landmarks along the road point to an approach by which a better understanding of the company can be had by looking at it in chunks beginning in the middle of one decade, and ending in the middle of the following one.

1939-1945: Pre-war and WWII - In this period, the company was not yet defined by Archie as the dominant character and force behind its publishing. Archie appears first as an anthology feature in the otherwise superhero-dominated titles Pep and Jackpot and receives his own title in 1943, but the majority of the company's output is still dominated by adventure features. Also in 1943, the company branches out with media adaptations of two of its most popular characters, with the radio series The Adventures of Archie Andrews, and The Black Hood. The former is a success and will continue running on one network or another for a decade, while the latter is a failure and lasts a single season. A pulp fiction magazine based on the Black Hood is also published to coincide with the radio series, but it too is a failure, lasting for only three issues. The success of Archie in his own self-titled comic book and as a radio series will decide the future direction of the company, with the shift from superheroes to comedy features in the anthology titles beginning almost as soon as the Black Hood's failure in other media becomes apparent, and will be largely complete by the end of the war. In actuality, the shift had begun even earlier, with the conversion of Top-Notch Comics (in which The Black Hood was the lead feature) to Top-Notch Laugh Comics (which continued to retain The Black Hood, but as a subordinate feature to other comedy features), beginning with issue #28, dated July 1942. Top-Notch Laugh Comics will end with issue #45 in May of 1945. Black Hood (the company's most successful superhero, along with The Shield) will outlive Top-Notch Laugh Comics in his own title, but only until issue #19 (June 1946).

1946-1955: Postwar Period - Superheroes are out of favor following the end of WWII, and comedy features (with ARCHIE as the flagship title) dominate the publisher's philosophy. "MLJ Magazines" is accordingly rechristened as "Archie Comic Publications" at the beginning of this period, and the Archie newspaper strip, launched early in 1946 under the sole creative control of Bob Montana, is the standard to which the comic book writers and artists look for their cues. In a very short time, the strip will be carried in hundreds of papers, exposing the character to audiences of millions not otherwise familiar with Archie in the comic books. This 10-year span also coincides with a boom period for the entire industry, with total industry sales peaking in the last couple of years prior to the institution of the Comics Code Authority seal on all comics distributed in 1955, indicating a sea-change for the entire industry. New titles spinning off from Archie begin proliferating at the end of the 1940s: Archie's Pal Jughead, Archie's Rival Reggie, Archie's Girls Betty and Veronica, and Archie's Pals 'n' Gals. Apart from the model established by Montana in the newspaper strip, no particular writers or artists on the Archie-related titles dominate the style or direction of the characters. By the end of this period, the erosion of sales will be heavily felt due to the rise of television as the dominant form of entertainment.

1956-1965: The Boomer Decade - Harry Lucey emerges as the major definer of Archie and his friends in the comic books, largely superseding Montana's conception as presented in the newspaper strip. Samm Schwartz does likewise in becoming the major artist defining Jughead as the star of his own series. At the beginning of the decade, Dan DeCarlo joins the company, at first moonlighting from his major employment at Atlas/Marvel, but by late in 1958 becoming a full-time freelancer at ACP. After that time, his importance in defining Betty and Veronica in their own title and as separate characters from Archie, gradually gains dominance over the Lucey conception of B&V at the beginning of this period. The importance of DeCarlo increases with the launch of Josie in 1963. Little Archie is conceived, written and drawn by Bob Bolling from 1956-1965, but is turned over to Dexter Taylor in 1965 in order to remake the low-selling title into something more closely resembling the main Archie title. Additional titles like Archie Giant Series, Archie's Madhouse, Archie's Joke Book, Jughead's Jokes, Life With Archie, and Archie and Me are launched and thrive. An attempted revival of Reggie in his own title is not successful, nor are other short-lived titles like Jughead's Fantasy. Samm Schwartz leaves Jughead and the company in 1965 to work for Harry Shorten at Tower Comics.

1966-1975: Everything's Archie - Beginning slightly earlier in 1965, there is a great deal of experimentation in response to the impact of cultural awareness of "camp" and "pop art", particularly resulting in the remaking of Archie, Jughead, Betty, and Reggie into superheroes as Pureheart, Captain Hero, Superteen, and Evilheart. The success of Silver Age superheroes at DC, and especially at Marvel, had resulted in revamping The Adventures of the Fly (running since 1959) as Fly-Man, and the revival of several of the company's Golden Age superheroes, resulting in the spinoff title The Mighty Crusaders. "Camp" abounded in these titles and on Archie's covers for most of 1966. The rise in popularity of DC and Marvel superhero comics in the early 1960s will affect not only competing comic book publishers, but also the content of Saturday morning animated programming in the 1966-1967 seasons. History will repeat itself, in a way, just as the crime and horror comics of the early 1950s inspired a parental backlash, a small vocal minority of concerned mothers will begin a movement against action/adventure-dominated children's fare on television, resulting in Filmation animation producer Lou Scheimer turning to Archie Comics in his search for a source of program content of a more innocuous and inoffensive nature. Archie Comics benefited from an unexpected windfall as the brief sales boom in superhero comics subsided in 1968, and ACP's new direction would take its cues from the successful Saturday morning animated shows The Archie Show, followed by Sabrina the Teenage Witch and then Josie and the Pussycats. Dan DeCarlo is given the responsibility of cover artist for the entire Archie lineup at the end of the decade, signaling the domination of his style as "the" Archie style. New titles will again proliferate beginning in the late 1960s: Archie's TV Laugh-Out, Sabrina the Teenage Witch, That Wilkin Boy, and the conversion of Archie's Madhouse into The Madhouse Glads, and Josie into Josie and the Pussycats. The animated shows bring an influx of new readers to Archie Comics, and titles like Everything's Archie are added to capitalize on the pop chart success of The Archies. As the superhero craze on television dies down by 1968, sales on superhero comics dwindle after a brief boomlet, and Archie Comics experiences a new sales boom of its own in teen humor titles during this period, with Archie outselling even Superman and The Amazing Spider-Man, and character merchandising at an all-time high. Archie's success as a publisher will even inspire the creation of teen humor titles at rival publishers DC and Marvel, along with other publishers. The animated adaptations continue to morph into different variations from season to season, but remain ubiquitous on television in various combinations of new episodes and reruns, from 1968-1975. It is during this period, as the main protagonist of Betty and Me for ten years, that Betty Cooper gradually gains acknowledgment from Archie that he sees her as more than a friend and "back-up date" and that he actually harbors romantic feelings for her. While she still remains the underdog in her rivalry with Veronica, the "Triangle" has been truly established by the close of the period. Late in this period, the company will briefly experiment with horror comics (Madhouse, Chilling Tales of Sorcery) under the Red Circle imprint, after the Comics Code is revised in 1972 (they are not successful). In 1975, Bob Montana dies, and ACP turns responsibility for the important newspaper strip over to Dan DeCarlo.

1976-1986: Changing Times - Newsstand sales begin to shrink in this period, but the worst is yet to come in the next period. As the latter half of the 1970s draws to a close, the animated adaptations are producing far fewer new episodes and reruns move from the major networks to syndication on local UHF stations. The boom of the previous period has ended, and the early 1980s sees the cancellations of many long-running titles that began in the previous period: Sabrina the Teenage Witch, Josie and the Pussycats, That Wilkin Boy, Reggie and Me. By the end of the period that will include all of the legacy titles: Pep, Laugh, Madhouse, Archie's TV Laugh-Out, Betty and Me. The first series of Betty and Veronica and Jughead will come to an end, to be replaced by new #1 issues beginning in 1987 (Betty and Me will be replaced by Betty #1), with only Archie carrying on the legacy numbering. Digest comics will become the major success for ACP by the end of this period, and by the next period they will dominate over sales of standard-format comic books, with the number of digest titles proliferating. At the end of the previous period, newsstand sales were still the dominant method of distribution for comic books, but by the end of this period, the balance will have shifted to specialized comic book stores catering mainly to hardcore comic book fans. The resultant loss of mass distribution in regular retail establishments across the country will profoundly affect ACP, as comic book shops cater to a much smaller audience of older consumer-collectors whose main interest is in the superhero genre.

4
All About Archie / Betty & Veronica - Lucey vs. DeCarlo
« on: September 09, 2017, 12:38:29 PM »
I've been re-reading Bart Beaty's TWELVE-CENT ARCHIE (since a new edition of the book came out with color illustrations) and seeing his comments in a somewhat different light than I did upon the first reading, a couple of years ago. I imagine that's because my understanding of the background context of the history of Archie has expanded considerably in the time since I first read it. Beaty is a devout admirer of Harry Lucey's work, and at one point in the book he makes the bold statement that "Of all the dozens of artists who contributed to Archie Comics in the twelve-cent era, the best, by far, was Harry Lucey." (emphasis mine) He goes on to say "His Archie is the most wide-eyed, his Betty and Veronica the most alluring, and his Jughead is the most relaxed."

"By far"? I had to think about that a bit, and while I'd certainly give it to Lucey when it came to Archie as the main character, and he draws a pretty sexy B&V, there's still something about his version of the girls that falls a little short, for me, of Dan DeCarlo's. How do I articulate exactly what quality it was that made DeCarlo's B&V superior to Lucey's?

When I think of Harry Lucey's version of the girls, it always seems to me that they carry themselves in a way a little too poised, a little too physically mature for their age. He's a good girl artist, but he subtracts a bit of his cartooning instincts and amps up his illustrator instincts when drawing them. His B&V seem reminiscent to me of the kind of glamour photography you might see from the 1940s or 1950s, and has a kind of "posed" quality to it, whenever B&V are strutting their stuff and showing off their curves.

Dan's B&V seem to have more of a relaxed, natural quality about them, as if caught in moments unaware that they're "having their picture taken". Despite the fact that they're both essentially the same girl in body and facial features with different hairstyles and clothing, Dan was better at making B&V each distinct by contrasting their different styles of body language. In thinking about it, I'd say DeCarlo better captured a balance in both girls' depiction between their youthful innocence and their physical charms, and that made them both more appealing and seem a little more real. I think he had a little better range on their expressions of different emotion than Lucey did, too.

Now, when it comes to who was the better ARCHIE artist (that is, the better artist for stories that focus on Archie as the main character), it's Lucey hands down. His range of portraying slapstick comedy, movement through space, and force and motion through body language was unequaled. He would have made a damn fine animator, if that had been the profession he'd chosen, because you can look at a Harry Lucey Archie story and see all the "key frames" (or "extremes") that would represent the points on which the animation turns, to be filled-in by in-betweeners. So if he had worked in animation, he'd either be the lead animator on the main character, or the director of the cartoon (who essentially does the same thing, in addition to coordinating all the other animators on the team). That ability to tell a story through slapstick action simply wasn't as essential a quality in most Betty & Veronica stories as it was in an Archie story.

And... I haven't quite decided whether Lucey was the best Silver Age Jughead artist or not, because I haven't quite spent enough time thinking about it or studying stories with that in mind, but my instincts are leading me to say... Samm Schwartz, particularly the pre-1965 Schwartz, whose earlier work I always liked better because of the inking quality on those stories before he left the company for the next four years (to go work for Tower Comics, and then DC). Schwartz' later Jughead is more minimalist, with fewer background details in the panels, and an unvarying ink line-weight, making everything look flatter and less 3-dimensional. But he still had a good storytelling sense of layouts and about the placement of figures within a panel to get some movement into it.

And beyond the Silver Age, after DeCarlo and then Lucey, who was the next best B&V artist after Lucey retired in the Bronze Age? I'm going to go with... Al Hartley. Especially when it came to Betty. Hartley seemed to have a real empathy for Betty, and it showed in his work, but beyond that, he was probably just, on average, the next best "girl artist". He didn't tend to flaunt that ability quite as much as DeCarlo and Lucey did, but when he wanted to, he could turn out some terrific stuff when the specific story allowed it. And after Hartley, once he'd been working at Archie for a few years and had gotten a handle on the characters and the house style... Stan Goldberg.

5
General Discussion / Re: Latest Hauls, what did you buy?
« on: September 09, 2017, 08:51:23 AM »
This is also on Hottopic.com and every size is sold out except for Extra Large




Some nice Dan Parent head shots there. Maybe it's me, but doesn't it seem a little weird that the shirt design allows space for a dozen character head shots, but it's the same six characters, repeated twice? ... Rather than, as would seem to make a lot more sense to me, including Moose, Midge, Chuck, Nancy, Cheryl, and Dilton? I suppose they could have made the main cast's heads a little larger, and the supporting cast's heads a little smaller (and mixed up the pattern) to make the main characters faces stand out a little more.

6
General Discussion / North American comics sales 2011-2016
« on: September 07, 2017, 11:15:59 PM »
I thought some people here might be interested in seeing these statistics. The bar graphs were created by Kate Willaert, from data jointly compiled by John Jackson Miller of Comichron, in collaboration with Milton Griepp of ICv2. I've no idea of where they got access to statistics such as total book market sales, digital sales, and newsstand/subscription sales, but I have faith that these are reasonably close estimates that represent the most accurate snapsnot of the total market as anyone's likely to get. The graphics ought to be self-explanatory.






7
All About Archie / Re: Lurid Little Nightmare Makers
« on: September 01, 2017, 11:03:56 AM »

And if he concluded that anyone but Bob Montana was responsible for the actual work of creation, I'll be shocked.

From the article, "Bob Montana plotted the first story with help from Harry Shorten, who had a Dell editor gone freelance, Vic Bloom, write the dialog. Vic Bloom named the Jughead character and also the area Riverdale. The 'Wally Williams' strip [created by Bloom for Popular Comics #48] had another character called 'Jughead' Lewis and the name of the city was Rivertown".

8
All About Archie / Re: Lurid Little Nightmare Makers
« on: August 31, 2017, 05:10:06 PM »
The article about Archie's creation is likely to be contentious, but Clancy lays out all the evidence he could find and it's well worth a read

And if he concluded that anyone but Bob Montana was responsible for the actual work of creation, I'll be shocked. Although I'll be the first to admit that Harry Shorten had more than a little to do with it, as well, in the early days. But it took years for Montana to really distill "the essence of Archie", and that didn't happen until 1946, when he got sole creative control of the newspaper strip. Goldwater's contribution was in giving the marching orders to create a comic feature along the lines of Andy Hardy and/or Henry Aldrich, and in committing to publishing the thing -- but that's hardly my definition of "creating". He outlined the hazy parameters, inasmuch as it was copying a popular archetype in other media, but it doesn't take much creativity to do that.

And you know... if you took "Andy Aldrich" and mixed up the letters a little, and squinted a bit... it's not too far off from "Archie Andrews".

9
All About Archie / Lurid Little Nightmare Makers
« on: August 31, 2017, 06:43:16 AM »
Has anyone else read Volume 7 of the fanzine 'Lurid Little Nightmare Makers'? I've only just come across it on Ebay, but it was published in December 2016 by Boardman books. It celebrates Archie at 75 and (amongst other, non-Archie things) includes:
  • an article on Archie's creation by Shaun Clancy
  • an interview with Dan Parent and a portfolio of his work
  • 81 Archie covers over the years
  • an article about whether Archie and Veronica had sex in the 1980s
  • a portfolio of Archie artwork as collected by Clancy

The article about Archie's creation is likely to be contentious, but Clancy lays out all the evidence he could find and it's well worth a read

10
General Discussion / Re: What comics have you been reading?
« on: August 25, 2017, 01:52:40 AM »
How was Best of Josie? Was it reprints from the prior Best of Josie collections? Reprints from Music, Magic, and Mayhem?

Full review to follow in a day or two, with complete contents listing. I need some time to cross-reference the prior digital collections, but there's quite a bit of duplication of the 1969-1989 stories, including a fair number that just appeared in the ABB:MM&M collection, and 3 from the Josie & the Scaredy Cats digital collection. There are only a few stories collected here that I haven't seen reprinted before, most notably the infamous "Vengeance From the Crypt" by Frank Doyle & Stan Goldberg, from JOSIE & THE PUSSYCATS #72 (Oct. 1973)  -- unfortunately marred by having been shot directly from the actual printed comic book pages; it looks a little muddy by comparison -- and 2 stories, "Love & War" & "Maxim Mix-Up" from JOSIE & THE PUSSYCATS (1993) #2. Although reprinted before, there's a nice selection from the 2000s run of ARCHIE & FRIENDS (#52-55) of four complete stories by Holly G. The rest is filled with the usual run of Stan Goldberg & Rex Lindsey shorts (from TV LAUGH-OUT and the 2nd series of LAUGH, and later issues of A&F), plus (*sigh*) the obligatory advertisement complete reprint of JOSIE & THE PUSSYCATS #1 (2016). It was still worth the price ($9.99 cover price - cheap!) for me, to get them in print format and collected all in one place (as opposed to scattered through a digest run of B & V FRIENDS).

11
General Discussion / Re: What are you listening too ?
« on: August 20, 2017, 12:37:16 PM »
I don't know if there's any significance, but I would definitely put it above all those things you list.  At least this is based on science.  I don't think you can say that about those other things.

All I'm saying is that your approach to it is no different than people who believe in those other things. Yours is a faith-based belief in science. It's kind of like when Arthur C. Clarke said "Any science sufficiently advanced beyond our understanding is indistinguishable from magic." I'm more of a "question everything, and believe only half of what they tell you" kind of guy. I don't believe in any science that I can't understand the basic underlying principles behind how it works, whether I fully grasp all the details or not. The exact connection between how biology relates to geography seems a little too vague to me. At what point when you're looking at the DNA test results does a bit of it jump up and wave its national flag? How does a complex carbohydrate protein molecule like Deoxyribose Nucleic Acid even have a claim to national origin? Do North Americans have different DNA than South Americans, and how can you tell the difference?

12
All About Archie / Re: Betty and Veronica #3
« on: June 26, 2017, 01:33:47 PM »
Additional layers of confusion are merely added by the fact that all the New Riverdale titles seem to look like they belong to the same universe, and vague cross-references have appeared here and there, along with some commonalities. Yet there is nothing distinctly pointing to the titles NOT being in the same universe, either. It's only when the stories are closely examined that we can discover that things just don't line up between them, but it's subtle and non-obvious unless you dig deeper.

I just read #2 and was surprised to see Cheryl there. I guess, if it's supposed to take place in the same universe as the "Archie" title, it occurs only after Veronica's return to Riverdale. It occurs in autumn of 2016, so I guess it's supposed to be the following school year, placing those Veronica-in-Switzerland issues in the 2015-2016 school year.

That's exactly what I mean. They're sort of the same, yet they're not, either. You can only discover the latter by dissecting the stories and trying to figure out if they can possibly inhabit the same universe, but at the same time, there's nothing obviously signalling the reader that they're NOT part of the same universe, until you examine all the little details.

But Cheryl is working for Veronica (washing cars) and calling her "coach". I can't imagine the Cheryl of the "Archie" title (or any version of Cheryl, actually) doing that.

Fair enough. And _I_ can't imagine any version of Betty I'm familiar with that's like the social justice warrior (what a drag!) portrayed in JUGHEAD.

So now it's like a murky question of which is it:

A) "Well, we just decided to go a different way here with the New Riverdale comics. OUR version of Jughead is self-identifying as asexual."

B) No, it's just plain BAD charaterization. The writers don't really know the classic versions of the characters beyond a superficial familiarity, so they're making up new characterizations for them as they go along.

C) "Hey, whatever works for the story. Let's not get hung up on details." Refer back to B.

D) "Well, obviously... DUH. Because it's a different universe. Oh, excuse me, I meant to say they're ALL different universes. Every single title. But we're not exactly going to come right out and say THAT, just in case some people might not like the idea."

I'm okay with it either way, as long as they don't start doing stories that cross over from one title to another. What I'm NOT okay with is having to guess at their intentions. I could live with some changes in art and storytelling style (presuming I LIKE those in the first place) if the characterizations stayed the same, but they seem to want to have that leeway for "interpretation" as well.

13
Reviews / Re: Some reviews.
« on: June 25, 2017, 12:23:25 AM »
SABRINA THE TEENAGE WITCH COMPLETE COLLECTION v1
(1962-1971) TP
  :smitten:

The short version is that it's the BEST trade paperback ACP has released yet, because it's exactly the sort of thing comic collectors want -- ALL Sabrina stories reprinted in chronological order of their original appearance. ALL the stories are credited, and the source of the original publication is noted in each case (there are a few errors that I caught). There's even a table of contents listing all the stories by title, and which page they're found on (something frustratingly lacking in most Archie Comics trade collections). The actual book design is very attractive as well. Here you get to see Sabrina's character develop over the early years in the same order readers of the time did, but in a highly focused and concentrated form. This collection is basically following the same blueprint as Marvel's Essential series, or DC Comics' Showcase Presents series: 500+ pages of comics on cheap paper, in black & white, at a bargain-basement price ($10), but the size is identical to that used for ACP's Best of Archie Comics or Archie's Favorite Comics collections.

How complete is it? ALL of Sabrina's stories (and a single cover appearance) from ARCHIE'S MADHOUSE/MADHOUSE MA-AD JOKES (before the title changed to THE MADHOUSE GLADS) are included, even the one-page and 1/2 page gags (plus you get a bonus 1/2 page gag featuring Fran the Fan and Bippy the Hippy). In a couple of those, Sabrina shared a story with other Madhouse regulars, like Ronald the Rubber Boy and Professor Transistor. ALL of Sabrina's early appearances from ARCHIE'S T.V. LAUGH-OUT (through issue #10), and issues #1 through 4 of SABRINA THE TEENAGE WITCH (all Archie Giant issues), plus the Sabrina stories from ARCHIE'S CHRISTMAS STOCKING and the very first Archie Giant Series SABRINA'S CHRISTMAS MAGIC issue (technically dated Jan. 1972). Many of those early stories have Sabrina interacting with Archie and the gang. ALL of the covers on which Sabrina appeared are also reproduced -- down to those on which Sabrina made only a cameo appearance as part of the crowd, including random issues of ARCHIE and JUGHEAD.

Don't let the black & white format put you off. It's even on cheaper, thinner paper (this applies to the cover stock as well) than previous books in the "Best of Archie Comics/Archie's Favorite Comics" series, which is a detraction, but the content of the book trumps all of those drawbacks. The fact of the matter is that once you begin reading the book, your awareness of "no color" quickly fades, because you become engrossed in the stories, and watching the evolution of Sabrina and her supporting cast unfold. I'm hoping that if people support this, it will someday get the same Deluxe Edition treatment as THE BEST OF ARCHIE COMICS - BOOK ONE. But the catch is, if no one supports this version of the book, that's never going to happen.

14
All About Archie / Re: Whew!
« on: June 24, 2017, 11:59:52 PM »
Here's Jughead "coming out of the closet"...

Makes you wonder, don't it? Exactly what DOES go on in the Supply Room closet at Riverdale High School???

15
All About Archie / Re: Deja Vu
« on: June 07, 2017, 01:41:36 AM »
It's interesting to compare what's the same and what's different in the two covers above.

THE SAME:
- the joke's identical; dialogue is word-for-word
- Reggie's pose is identical
- Betty's pose is almost identical (one arm with elbow bent, hand on hip; the other holding her tennis racket) - the two are mirror images except for the direction in which Betty is looking

DIFFERENT:
- On #14, Betty is foreground central and the largest figure
- On #15, Archie & Veronica are the largest figures, foreground left
- On #14, Archie & Veronica are the smallest figures, but perspective lines and the direction of Betty's line of sight both lead the viewer's eye
- Betty has gone from being LEFT-handed on #14 to RIGHT-handed on #15!

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